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Comment: Re:maybe.. (Score 1) 155

by Jason Kimball (#36128208) Attached to: Samsung Unveils New 10" Retina Display

Except 1280x800 is actually better for watching 720p movies because they can be displayed at native resolution without any rescaling. You don't make use of 40 rows of pixels above and below, but that's fine with me. With 1366x768, sure you fill all the pixels, but there's rescaling going on, which can reduce the sharpness of the video.

Comment: Re:My Motto (Score 1) 931

by Jason Kimball (#33782296) Attached to: 66% of All Windows Users Still Use Windows XP

What if my screen is turned off/not showing up or my mouse isn't plugged in and I want to reboot or turn off my computer. How do you do this with just your keyboard under Windows 7?

In Windows XP it was 3 keys in order: Windows key, u, r. Windows key, u, u would turn off computer.

I STILL haven't found a convenient keyboard only way of rebooting/shutdown through the start menu.

2 steps forward, one step backwards?

(I do run Windows 7 on 2/3 of my computers, XP on the other for backwards compatibility testing).

Comment: Re:I have an idea to stop the need for anti-biotic (Score 1) 551

by Jason Kimball (#33764060) Attached to: Animal Farms Are Pumping Up Superbugs

It's the other way. When you feed them corn, you can keep them in close quarters where filth and disease can spread easily.

When you feed them grass, by letting them graze on a pasture, you have to give them more room, which reduces the concentration of filth and disease.

Also having them more spread out and moving around makes it easier to detect ill cattle and treat them individually.

Comment: Re:Will the real 3D please stand up (Score 1) 190

by Jason Kimball (#33487082) Attached to: The New Difficulties In Making a 3D Game

This is true. We won't have real 3D until they perfect holographic display devices. The difference between the perceived depth and the fact that the image is really at the depth of your TV screen (and needs to be focused at that distance to project a clear image on to your retina) throws your brain for loops. 3D movies skirt this issue because the screen is already so far away, but sit a reasonable distance in front of a TV and after 15 minutes your brain fighting two contrasting focal senses will start to cause problems.

Comment: Re:How does 'focus' effect things? (Score 1) 190

by Jason Kimball (#33487058) Attached to: The New Difficulties In Making a 3D Game

Besides 3D movies, have you used some type of 3D display? Whether you noticed it or not, there are actually two types of focusing going on a the same time.

I'll call the first type "stereoscopic depth". The disparity between the two images that each eye sees is what gives the 3D illusion, as your eyes try and focus to different depths in order to fuse the two images. You can visualize this, as mentioned below, by holding your finger at arms length and switching between that and your monitor. You should see two blurry fingers when you look at your monitor.

The second type I will call "image depth". This is the focusing of the lens of your eye to get a sharp image projected on to your retina. You can visualize this with an outstretched finger, but this time close one eye. With the open eye switch between your finger and monitor and notice how your finger is still blurry when focused on your monitor, but much more subtly. This actually hinders most stereoscopic displays, because your brain has trouble compensating for the fact that when it focuses on the "stereoscopic depth" it is getting the wrong "image depth".

In 3D movies, you don't notice it so much because the focal plane is already so far away, however for TVs or computer screens, or even head mounted devices, the effect is much more pronounced. It is also one of the contributing factors to sickness and headaches while using VR environments.

So while you say that your eyes will always be focused on the computer screen, you actually have it backwards. Your eyes will be trying to focus on the perceived 3D depth. And therefore, you will not be able to perceive both near and far objects as being in focus at the same time, just like in real life, and jumping between them rapidly could cause more of a problem than in real life because you are missing the 2nd focus queue of proper "image depth".

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