Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:You are asking the wrong queston... (Score 1) 343

by Jaime2 (#49074837) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Version Control For Non-Developers?

Serialized workflow is the enemy of scalabilty. I would do it in many circumstances because the benefits of the tool (Word in this case) outweigh the costs of the workflow it requires. But I wouldn't confuse that with consciously choosing a serialized workflow.

It many cases were a customer of mine has multi-user editing problems, I find that the root cause is that they store bits of information with different use patterns in the same document. Simply splitting the document often fixes the problem.

Comment: Re:You are asking the wrong queston... (Score 1) 343

by Jaime2 (#49074491) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Version Control For Non-Developers?
You are trying to shoehorn the process into one that works with the limitations of desktop document editing programs. Switching to collaborative editing solutions, or moving the data from documents to databases would likely bypass the need to restrict the process to one editor at a time. I'm not saying that either is a better solution than your suggestion, but I have shown that what you are suggesting is only one of many ways forward.

Comment: Re:Use GIT (Score 3, Insightful) 343

by Jaime2 (#49074421) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Version Control For Non-Developers?

Git and SVN are different products. SVN is centralized and git is distributed. If you want to create a centralized repository and only allow people to have access to certain parts of it, SVN is a much better fit for that workflow. Neither allows the user to browse the document repository with first checking it out. Well, they both have web interfaces, but those don't support a good editing workflow.

Comment: Re:There's a reason the REAL gear is expensive (Score 1) 248

by Jaime2 (#49050905) Attached to: Smart Homes Often Dumb, Never Simple

That's not the whole story. Unfortunately, very few vendors in the market see value in the old fashioned "build a better mousetrap and the world will beat a path to your door" philosophy. Instead, most have some strange profit angle that ends up reducing the utility of the stuff they sell. You see too many ad-ladened smart phone apps, subscription services, or good ole' vendor lock-in in the affordable stuff.

For example, I have a garage door opener that has automation features. Unfortunately, every time IOS or Android update, either me or my wife can't use the smart features for a few months. They have a halfway decent app, but it will never be integrated with anything else and they won't publish an API spec to allow me to use an alternative method of control. This is very short-sighted. Opening up an API won't make the geek money rain down on you tomorrow, but if a critical mass of vendors do it, the market will mature to the point where you can put something together out of cheap components.

Comment: Re:Ask Japan... (Score 1) 309

by Jaime2 (#49020155) Attached to: The IPCC's Shifting Position On Nuclear Energy

Exactly how many nuclear disasters does it take before we figure out how to do what these other countries are already doing?

It took zero. We stopped building Nuclear plants before Chernobyl (29 deaths) or Fukushima (1 death) happened. Now that we had one due to old tech and misuse and one due to neglect and a huge earthquake, it's still the wrong thing to do.

Comment: Re: Yay for "zero tolerance" (Score 1) 591

by Jaime2 (#48973399) Attached to: Texas Boy Suspended For "Threatening" Classmate With the One Ring

Should you fire the person that is likely legally bound to make a very nonsensical call?

That's an idea. It would certainly speed up the process of getting these policies reviewed and revised and fix the "sorry my hands are tied" attitudes that people making sense keep getting stonewalled with.

Comment: Re: Yay for "zero tolerance" (Score 1) 591

by Jaime2 (#48968475) Attached to: Texas Boy Suspended For "Threatening" Classmate With the One Ring

And exactly what the fuck do you know about fear?

I too am a parent. I am much more afraid that my child will be harmed by a friend or by her own choices than by a stranger shooting up a school or a by drug dealer. These zero tolerance policies don't address any fear I have. The links you provided don't represent anything I'm afraid of.

Comment: Re: Yay for "zero tolerance" (Score 1) 591

by Jaime2 (#48960909) Attached to: Texas Boy Suspended For "Threatening" Classmate With the One Ring

I agree we shouldn't live in fear, but we need to keep our eyes open.

... followed by why you live in fear.

Bad things have always happened. Bad things will continue to happen no matter how much you try to control them. The idea that you will only accept a situation after you have wrung the very last ounce of risk out of it is pretty much the definition of cowardice. Bravery would be doing something despite great risk - I'm not advocating that. Rather, sending your kids to school when there is a statistically low chance of harm is simply the sensible thing to do.

Comment: Re:It's not the gas... (Score 1) 239

by Jaime2 (#48953087) Attached to: NFL Asks Columbia University For Help With Deflate-Gate

OK, so I guess I'm wrong, the NFL has no experience with inflating footballs. There are multiple balls inflated for each of the many games each week throughout the season and this has been going on for quite a few years, but they still don't really know anything about inflated leather balls. Right.

They asked for the help, that's the point of the article. If they were confident in their conclusions, this thread wouldn't exist in its current form. I am not making some wild assumption that they don't know what they are doing - the NFL asked for help.

I realized that they probably only asked for help because they wanted to get a response from someone with an un-assailable reputation, not because they are buffoons. But, it still happened, and pointing out that they know what they are doing does not advance the conversation.

Comment: Re:It's not the gas... (Score 4, Insightful) 239

by Jaime2 (#48952903) Attached to: NFL Asks Columbia University For Help With Deflate-Gate

So, I said that the behavior of gasses is well understood and you responded with the ideal gas law. Are you agreeing or disagreeing with me? If you are agreeing, then why post?

Next you mentioned the the NFL has a bunch of experience with this. Yet, it is the NFL that is asking for help. Obviously they don't agree with you.

The sooner you make your first 5000 mistakes, the sooner you will be able to correct them. -- Nicolaides

Working...