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Comment: Re:SSD storage? (Score 2) 914

by Ian_Bailey (#40310025) Attached to: Analyzing the New MacBook Pro

While limited writes are certainly a factor, they probably aren't going to be a major issue for basic consumer use.

Most SSD storage drivers these days automatically spread the writes around the drive, so to hit the write limit you will need to write the equivalent of the capacity of the drive multiplied by the write limit of any particular register. Assuming 2 million write cycles per register, and the low-end 256 GB drive, that's 500,000 TB of writing before you burn out every register. Obviously the user would see some degradation before that, but there's still lots of room to play with.

Some more sample calculations are available here: http://www.storagesearch.com/ssdmyths-endurance.html

Comment: Re:Translation from Canadian CorpoSpeak (Score 3, Informative) 404

by Ian_Bailey (#38793145) Attached to: Outgoing CRTC Head Says Technology Is Eroding Canadian Culture

Neither Rogers or Bell offer anything but cell phones in over half the country. If you live in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan or Manitoba in the west, and much of eastern Canada as well, you cannot get TV or Internet via Rogers with the exception of 3/4g at 500mb for $50 a month. It is the same with Bell.
But you claim to have an idea of Canadian culture.

Just because a company does not operate nation-wide, that does not mean that it cannot be a monopoly/duopoly. You just need to change your market definition from "Canada-wide Internet Access" to "Internet Access in B.C." or "Internet Access in Ontario." In fact, Shaw and Rogers did a swap back in 2000 to concentrate their networks along these lines: http://www.businessedge.ca/archives/article.cfm/shaw-and-rogers-in-4-billion-swap-4992

What the original poster meant was that, in any given market in Canada, there are at most two companies then own lines into someone's home. If you're in BC, it's Telus and Shaw. If you're in Ontario, it's Bell and Rogers. In any case, these two companies are doing their best to ensure there is not a third line coming into the house, so they can keep their prices artificially high for as long as possible.

Comment: Re:Pathfinder driven? (Score 3, Informative) 309

by Ian_Bailey (#38642512) Attached to: 5th Edition of <em>Dungeons &amp; Dragons</em> Announced

While the PDF is not free, the core content is freely available on the Internet as a "Reference Document" under the terms of the Open Game License. Paizo hosts all of the details from most of their books themselves (http://paizo.com/pathfinderRPG/prd/), but there are many other websites that reproduce and compile details from different sources, including third party content (http://www.d20pfsrd.com/ is one).

Under the terms of the license, all of the core rules can be re-packaged and sold in your own game. Only the proper names unique to the Pathfinder setting (characters, deities, etc) are copyrighted and cannot be used.

Comment: Re:Deceptive Summary (Score 1) 282

by Ian_Bailey (#37628202) Attached to: Satellite Glitch Leaves Northern Canada In the (Internet) Dark

Although you are correct in that it is not a literal power outage, it is far more than just the "INTARWEBS", because so much in the North depends on Satellite communication.

From the article:
"People in Iqaluit are reporting they are without cell phone service and long-distance calling, bank machines and debit-card machines. At least one bank in the city has not opened today as a result. Flights are also being delayed."

Communications

The State of UK Broadband — Not So Fast 279

Posted by kdawson
from the but-you-have-actual-competition dept.
Barence writes "The deplorable speed of British broadband connections has been revealed in the latest figures from the Office of National Statistics, which show that 42.3% of broadband connections are slower than 2Mb/sec. More worryingly, the ONS statistics are based on the connection's headline speed, not actual throughput, which means that many more British broadband connections are effectively below the 2Mb/sec barrier. Better still, a separate report issued yesterday by Ofcom revealed that the majority of broadband users had no idea about the speed of their connection anyway."
Networking

A Web App For Real-Time Collaborative Writing 157

Posted by kdawson
from the write-on dept.
adamengst writes in with good news for anyone who needs to collaborate remotely on a writing or editing project — coding too. It's especially good news for those using Windows and Linux. Mac users have had SubEthaEdit for a few years now. With EtherPad, two or more people can edit a document and see all the edits simultaneously. EtherPad's main differences from SubEthaEdit: it's a Web application that de facto supports many platforms without the need for a central Mac OS X host; and it's free. Here is a comparison of EtherPad and SubEthaEdit.

SPAW Editor 2 Released 24

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the php-made-easier dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Solmetra has released a stable version of SPAW Editor PHP Edition version 2 — one of the best web-based open source WYSIWYG editors on the market. Version 2 adds tabbed multi-document interface, floating/shared toolbars, a resize-able editing area, Opera support, and many other exciting new features. One of the most exciting news in version 2 is its modular architecture allowing for virtually unlimited possibilities in extending core functionality."
Media

+ - Wiki - Future Knowledge Management System?

Submitted by
andrewok
andrewok writes "Wikipedia is the best known and the most visited wiki site on the web, currently ranking no. 12 on Alexa. But Wikipedia is not the only wiki — there are many other public wikis sites and wikis are also gaining popularity as enterprise knowledge management systems.

As a webmaster of BridgeArt.net, a portal devoted to online civil engineering community, I recently distributed electronic "wiki questionnaire" to learn more about what this specific online community knows about wiki and if it would be interested in its own specialized wiki. I received many interesting comments and surprisingly more than 80% of respondents would be in favor of a wiki site devoted specifically to the community.

I believe that the questionnaire results could be generalized to other online communities. And perhaps, wikis are indeed on their way to become the knowledge management systems of the future."
Encryption

Decryption Keys For HD-DVD Found, Confirmed 473

Posted by kdawson
from the house-of-cards dept.
kad77 writes "It appears that, despite skepticism, 'muslix64' was the real deal. Starting from a riddle posted on pastebin.com, members on the doom9 forum identified the Title key for the HD-DVD release 'Serenity.' Volume Unique Keys and Title keys for other discs followed within hours, confirming that software HD-DVD players, like any common program, store important run-time data in memory. Here's a link to decryption utility and sleuthing info in the original doom9 forum thread. The Fair Use crowd has won Round One; now how will the industry respond?"
Power

Which Rechargeable Batteries Do You Use? 176

Posted by Cliff
from the they-keep-going-and-going dept.
kramer2718 asks: "I go through a lot of batteries in my digital camera, remote controls, etc. I'd like to go to the rechargeable route for the environment and for my pocketbook, but I don't know which rechargeable batteries are the best. Can anyone out there give me some advice about which brand and types of batteries work well?"

Prof: So the American government went to IBM to come up with a data encryption standard and they came up with ... Student: EBCDIC!"

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