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Comment: Re:I'm the app's developer. Happy to answer questi (Score 2) 100

All the best to you. However, I'm not going to deface the paper version of the book, especially a hard cover, just to get a free or cheaper e-book. I'm a reader who likes his books pristine, I don't highlight and I don't take notes in the margins. If I want to take notes that's what note cards or my phone is for. Scrawling in the book is anathema to me. Based on the reviews I saw in the Apple app store, I'm not alone in this. And like one of the other reviews I saw, I also have a largish paper book library. Take that for what you will.

Comment: Seems the anger is misdirected (Score 4, Insightful) 596

by Goat of Death (#48603333) Attached to: Waze Causing Anger Among LA Residents

Strikes me they should angry at either the city of L.A. or the state of California for not investing in better road infrastructure. Waze is a symptom of overburdened roads, lack of proper infrastructure is the cause.

I'd also be curious to know how many of these folks may have voted against tax increases to fund road infrastructure.

Comment: Re:Yes, but the real problem is being ignored. (Score 1) 461

by Goat of Death (#48348565) Attached to: Washington Dancers Sue To Prevent Identity Disclosure

I live in Washington. From what I have read it's pretty hard to convict indecent exposure. It requires several tests that must all pass. For one, someone must actually be affronted and complain, the police can't just arrest you for being nude without someone claiming actual alarm. It also has to be proven that the nude person intended to affront or alarm someone. Being naked in public is not enough to prove this. Reasonable people see nudity commonly enough. So just seeing someone nude is not reasonable alarm. The law is intended to target things like flashers, not general nudity.

Comment: Re:Good (Score 1) 300

by Goat of Death (#47462549) Attached to: Massive Job Cuts Are Reportedly Coming For Microsoft Employees

This is as bad as the % category and number ranking Microsoft used to explicitly do. It encourages good people to work in dysfunctional groups so they won't be part of the bottom 5%. It also punishes high performing groups that actually drive the bottom line. Needing Senior VP approval to not cut folks because you have a high performing group is beyond ridiculous.

Comment: Re:How is it their fault? (Score 1) 653

by Goat of Death (#45764069) Attached to: Protesters Block Apple and Google Buses In California

Doing what is most economically efficient is not always what's best for society as a whole. The bankers and deregulators that helped create the Great Recession were just doing what was most economically efficient at the time. Tunnel vision like that often leads to very huge negative unintended consequences. Doing what is most economically efficient readily contributes to the destruction of the commons, whereby all of us suffer in small and large ways.

Most strawberry farms won't be replaced with a Disneyland, they'll be replaced with just another shopping mall. As a counter thought, consider what would happen if you decided to sell off Central Park in Manhattan. It's prime real estate and a lot of folks could do some very economically efficient things with that land. However, it would absolutely gut the character of Manhattan and a huge portion of the appeal of living there.

Building a city worth living in and being a part of cannot be viewed in strictly economic terms. And what's best for the economy is not always best for the people inhabiting a society. Some level of balance should be struck.

Comment: Re:How is it their fault? (Score 1) 653

by Goat of Death (#45764063) Attached to: Protesters Block Apple and Google Buses In California

Doing what is most economically efficient is not always what's best for society as a whole. The bankers and deregulators that helped create the Great Recession were just doing what was most economically efficient at the time. Tunnel vision like that often leads to very huge negative unintended consequences. Doing what is most economically efficient readily contributes to the destruction of the commons, whereby all of us suffer in small and large ways.

Most strawberry farms won't be replaced with Disney, they'll be replaced with just another shopping mall. As a counter thought, consider what would happen if you decided to sell off Central Park in Manhattan. It's prime real estate and a lot of folks could do some very economically efficient things with that land. However, it would absolutely gut the character of Manhattan and a huge portion of the appeal of living there.

Building a city worth living in and being a part of cannot be viewed in strictly economic terms. And what's best for the economy is not always best for the people inhabiting a society. Some level of balance should be struck.

Comment: Re:Tor compromised (Score 1) 620

This! After Enigma was cracked in WWII, the allies went to great length to make sure it remained cracked. They would fly fake recon flights near the locations of subs they knew about. This would make it appear as though the subs where found through conventional means.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra#Safeguarding_of_sources

Comment: Oh, this brings me back. (Score 1) 356

by Goat of Death (#44937689) Attached to: California Elementary Schools To Test Anti-Piracy Curriculum

While I didn't have an entire curriculum dedicated to anti-piracy, I did have to take CompSci as a graduation requirement from my high school. One of our assignments consisted of writing a children's book on the evils of hacking and piracy. Naturally, I took the opportunity to make a complete mockery of the assignment. Mr Peepers and the MegaVirus was the result. Highlights included an over the top evil mastermind wearing an adamantium mask, a virus causing a computer to get so hot it exploded, and impalation on a mounted unicorn head. Oh good times.

+ - America's Bridges May Be Falling Down Soon

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy (2660665) writes "Oh dear. Turns out a recent analysis of data found in the National Bridge Inventory (yes, someone tracks bridge data) suggests we're in for a bit of trouble. The data: Of 607,380 bridges, 65,605 were classified as 'structurally deficient,' and 20,808 as 'fracture critical.' (If just one component on a fracture-critical bridge fails, it puts the bridge at risk of immediate collapse.) What's more, 7,795 bridges had both problems — a situation typically referred to as the 'double whammy.' Here is the translation of all the numbers: 13 percent of bridges in America are failing, and hundreds more will reach that state soon. How much will it take to address this? A mere $3.6 trillion, by the year 2020."

I have never seen anything fill up a vacuum so fast and still suck. -- Rob Pike, on X.

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