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Comment: Re:STEM + Critical Thinking is what's needed (Score 1) 397

by GeekBoy (#49379617) Attached to: Why America's Obsession With STEM Education Is Dangerous

I'd say that the best way to learn how to think critically is by studying math, which teaches your brain how to structure your critical thinking. That said, the data you are going feed into that structure needs to come from a broad and relevant set of data and some understanding of the structure of that data or at least the underlying relevant drivers. That input is going to come from a liberal-arts education, not a STEM education.

Comment: Re:Broken thinking... (Score 4, Informative) 397

by GeekBoy (#49379567) Attached to: Why America's Obsession With STEM Education Is Dangerous

In my experience this is not the case. The ability to handle math does suggest the ability to think and analyse, however, it does not follow that you have the ability to communicate clearly and effectively. Much too often I run into co-workers who are technically very smart, but cannot even write an understandable email. Their emails are a series of long run-on sentences, often with little to no punctuation. At the end of reading them I'm often left wondering what they were trying to say.

Comment: Go to a Liberal Arts school... (Score 1) 397

by GeekBoy (#49379535) Attached to: Why America's Obsession With STEM Education Is Dangerous

This is why I think it's important for STEM majors to go to a liberal arts school. A school that forces you to do a number of credits from different faculties and will force you to take courses in the social 'sciences,' arts, literature, history philosophy, religion, anthropology, etc. I would also agree with the comments on writing. Too often these days I run into people who cannot compose a cogent email let alone a memo or document. While technical skills are very important, leadership and communications skills are key differentiators in any business.

Comment: Re:So-called "conservatism" in action. (Score 0) 168

by GeekBoy (#46021425) Attached to: Canadian Health Scientists Resort To Sneaker Net After Funding Slashed

It's not so called conservatism it's actually conservatism. The public service in Canada is pretty large and it's not sustainable. Canada is basically going through it's own downsizing of government they started about 1-2 years ago when they laid-off a lot of public sector employees and reduced spending all around. Every public servant in Ottawa was in a tizzy for months, you'd have thought the world was coming to an end to hear them speak of the calamities that were going to result in this. Personally, as a Canadian I pay way too much in taxes already while public servants make more, work less and have big pensions that they can retire on. Me, I'll probably never be able to retire.

So yes, this is liberal hand waving at it's finest. (And just so you know, national archives and many other gov't department 'libraries' are the places where they send the people no other group wants; because of the unions they can't fire them.)

Education

H-1B Cap Reached Today; Didn't Get In? Too Bad 512

Posted by timothy
from the cue-up-the-nativist-indignation dept.
First time accepted submitter Dawn Kawamoto writes "Employers stampeding into the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service to get their H-1B petitions filed before the cap is reached are getting the door slammed in their face today. The cap was hit in near record time of 5 days, compared to the 10 weeks it took last year to have more than enough petitions to fulfill the combined cap of 85,000 statutory and advanced degree H-1B petitions. While U.S. tech workers scream that they're losing out on jobs as H-1B workers are hired, employers are countering that the talent pool is lacking and they need to increase the cap. Of course, Congress is wrangling in on this one as to whether it's time to raise the bar."

Comment: Re:works if you have exhaustive unit tests (Score 1) 113

Oh yes, because waiting 3-6 months to patch a vulnerability that can lead to exploited systems, infrastructure and ultimately your IP being sent to China or Russia is a better option.

I'm sure that if the cost of one web-browser not working is 10 million dollars, the cost of eliminating rootkits/trojans from all the desktops on your network, (and maybe some of the servers) is going to be so much less.

As mentioned below. If you are actually running your operations, instead of letting your users do it for you, you'll be managing testing and deploying yourself from a central system.

Dead? No excuse for laying off work.

Working...