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Submission + - Slashdot Burying Stories About Slashdot Media Owned SourceForge-> 1 1

KMSelf writes: DICE-owned Slashdot are burying stories over DICE-owned SourceForge taking over admi accounts for existing projects and injecting adware into installers.

As a Slashdotter since before logins and registrations, this is simply pathetic.

As Dan Luu writes:"I’m amazed at how quickly it’s possible to destroy user trust, and how much easier it is to destroy a brand than to create one."

Indeed.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - SourceForge assumes ownership of GIMP For Win, wraps installer in adware->

An anonymous reader writes: It appears that SourceForge is assuming control of all projects that appear "abandoned." In a blog update on their site, they responded saying in part "There has recently been some report that the GIMP-Win project on SourceForge has been hijacked; this project was actually abandoned over 18 months ago, and SourceForge has stepped-in to keep this project current. "

SourceForge is now offering "to establish a program to enable users and developers to help us remove misleading and confusing ads."

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Meet the man who steals your Instagram photos and sells them for $90,000->

An anonymous reader writes: It’s well established that anything one posts online these days remains permanently etched on the Internet. The moment a tweet or a photo goes up, it’s practically impossible to scrub it from its new-found digital existence. For most people, this is no big deal as the benefits to be gleaned from sharing items like photos with friends far outweigh any concerns about privacy. But once someone starts profiting from your personal photos, the dynamics of the equation completely change.

Meet Richard Prince, an “artist” whose skill set consists of photographing other people’s photographs, adjusting them slightly, and then selling them for enormous profit. It admittedly sounds bizarre, but Prince has been making a living doing just that for decades now.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Your Facebook Posts Are Revealing More Than You Think

BarbaraHudson writes: From the another-reason-not-to-use-facebook-that-will-be-ignored dept

Global News reports that British researchers have found that the type of status messages you leave on Facebook tells a lot about your personality.

People who didn’t think highly about themselves had a tendency to post updates about their romantic relationships, or lack thereof. Those with neurotic personalities provided personal updates, but they craved validation, the study noted. Narcissists loved to provide updates about their diet, physique and exercise routine.

Conscientiousness was tied to writing more about family. But if you were posting mostly about your kids, you were taking up an “indirect form of competitive parenting.” Extroverts used Facebook primarily as a means to communicate for social events and connect with friends.

Comment The savings is coming from the national power grid (Score 4, Informative) 267 267

From the politifact article:

On Block Island, it’s the Block Island Power Company, whose on-island generators run on diesel fuel, which must be shipped to the island by boat.

A 2010 Providence Journal story on the island’s power system noted that diesel fuel regularly costs $1 more per gallon on the island than on the mainland.

In fiscal 2011, according to a report by the town’s Electric Utility Task Group on the fiscal costs and benefits of the wind-farm project, the average cost of electricity on the island was 47 cents per kilowatt hour. In the rest of Rhode Island it was 14.8 cents.

Once the cable is laid and the wind farm project is on line, in 2014 or 2015, Block Island Power will be able to purchase electricity from the New England power network at much lower costs.

The task group estimated that electric rates on the island -- based on a 20-year agreement between Deepwater Wind and National Grid -- would fall to 30.7 cents per kilowatt hour, a 35.4-percent decrease from 2011 rates.

(The island’s rates would still be substantially higher than those on the mainland because its customers would be paying for a portion of the costs for installing the cable and for maintenance of the island’s power system.)

The task group’s analysis noted that current power costs on Block Island have risen to 54 cents per kilowatt hour because of the increasing diesel costs. Based on that figure, the decrease would be a 42-percent drop -- about what Deepwater said in its Tweet.

The other article doesn't mention anything about how much power and at what price the wind farm will be generating it. It sounds like the public relations department is doing all the talking.

Comment Re:Imagine that! (Score 1) 191 191

Corruption is rampant nearly everywhere. Plus last time I heard Spain was a democratic regime with a parliamentary monarchy.

In the USA the MPAA and RIAA pass stupid laws all the time why do you think in Spain things would be different?

He doesn't, he was telling that to the naive person he was responding who thinks it should be different.

Submission + - BrowserStack compromised?-> 3 3

algofoogle writes: While not yet confirmed to be a security breach, customers of BrowserStack have apparently received a facetious email claiming the service is shutting down. The language hints at a disgruntled employee or nefarious user, alleging that aspects of the Terms of Service are false, while also revealing apparently-sensitive internal information. Whether coincidental or in response to the email, BrowserStack.com is currently offline, stating that "we're performing some maintenance at the moment".
Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Why at a place of learning? (Score 1) 1007 1007

I like where you're going with this. They can be documented and studied. Their arguments can be deconstructed and debated. There could be another conference sometime afterward to discuss what has been learned from studying the creationists' conference.

Submission + - NSA possibly using loophole for additional unconstitutional surveillance

An anonymous reader writes: By routing American traffic out of the country using either BGP or DNS attacks, a new research paper posits that the NSA could be using an Executive Order permitting unfiltered foreign data collection to justify thwarting its duty to protect the constitutional rights of American citizens. From a new article:

the lesser-known Executive Order (EO) 12333, which remains solely the domain of the Executive Branch — along with United States Signals Intelligence Directive (USSID) 18, designed to regulate the collection of American's data from surveillance conducted on foreign soil — can be used as a legal basis for vast and near-unrestricted domestic surveillance on Americans.

The legal provisions offered under EO 12333, which the researchers say "explicitly allows for intentional targeting of U.S. persons" for surveillance purposes when FISA protections do not apply, was the basis of the authority that reportedly allowed the NSA to tap into the fiber cables that connected Google and Yahoo's overseas to U.S. data centers.

Submission + - MIT Designs Tsunami Proof Floating Nuclear Reactor->

Amtrak writes: MIT has created designs for a nuclear plant that would avoid the downfall of the Fukushima Daiichi plant. The new design calls for the nuclear plant to be placed on a floating platform modeled after the platforms used for offshore oil drilling.

A floating platform several miles offshore, moored in about 100 meters of water, would be unaffected by the motions of a tsunami; earthquakes would have no direct effect at all. Meanwhile, the biggest issue that faces most nuclear plants under emergency conditions — overheating and potential meltdown, as happened at Fukushima, Chernobyl, and Three Mile Island — would be virtually impossible at sea.

Link to Original Source

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