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+ - Sorry Dave..Judge Refuses Samsung Permission to Use Images from 2001: A Space Od->

Submitted by
DavidGilbert99
DavidGilbert99 writes "Samsung has failed once again to get permission to use some evidence in it patent trial with Apple. Samsung is attempting to disprove Apple's claim that the iPhone's design was unique at the time of launch in 2007.

It failed in its bid to use evidence related to the F700 phone and now has been refused permission once again to use images from Stanley Kubrick's seminal science fiction film 2001: A Space Odyssey as well as images from British science fiction show The Tomorrow People."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:What does it tell you? (Score 1) 274

by FTWinston (#40856449) Attached to: Valve Shares Performance Numbers On Port of <em>Left4Dead</em>

So I don't know why anyone should be surprised at this, Linux has always been OpenGL, Windows DirectX, so having Linux do OpenGL better isn't surprising, anymore than Windows doing DirectX, its just what the platform is made for is all.

Assuming I understand you correctly, I should perhaps have rephrased this:

What I find more interesting, to be honest, is that Open GL is (slightly) outperforming Direct 3D on a windows/nvidia box.

To:
What I find more interesting, to be honest, is that Open GL on a windows/nvidia box is (slightly) outperforming Direct 3D on the same box.

Comment: Re:Wrong premise for games! (Score 1) 254

by FTWinston (#40748873) Attached to: Neuroscience May Cure Videogames Industry's Obsession With Guns
I don't think this technique can reveal what's good about Dostoyevsky, nor indeed what's good about computer games. It can, however, show you whether or not something else has the same neurological effect as reading Dostoyevsky, or playing a shooter, or whatever. If they were able to recreate the identical (your word) neural stimulation, then I would - but I don't think they'd ever be able to recreate it identically, so that's perhaps not so important.

This neuro technique presupposes that you accomplish what you want by just skipping the insight and going straight to the rush of pleasure that insight causes.

I've not read TFA, but I'm not convinced that they are making that supposition. Any reason why they wouldn't consider the build up (which they can presumably also track) to be an equally important part of the phenomenon? They may be missing the point entirely, but they're the neurologists, so I'd hope they wouldn't disregard that sort of thing.

Comment: Re:Lame (Score 3, Insightful) 254

by FTWinston (#40746893) Attached to: Neuroscience May Cure Videogames Industry's Obsession With Guns

Those that are about that, unless they're SF or fantasy-based, should strive to have the most realistic experience as digitally possible but there is no substitute for the firing range.

Surely they'd be better off striving to have the most enjoyable experience possible? Especially if you say that they'd still be "no substitute." A sniper game that involves hiding in the one place for 2 days straight, for instance, may be realistic, but why would anyone want to play it? Give me TF2 any day.

Comment: Re:You don't understand. (Score 1) 1165

by FTWinston (#40352063) Attached to: Blocking Gun Laws With Patents
So some of your states don't kill people? Looks like the rest are keeping nice company.

Merely rhetorical questions: Do you believe the most vile of criminals such as pedophiles, murderers and rapists can honestly meet justice with a life sentence? Should people who are serving sentences which are guaranteed to extend well past their natural life span be supported on taxpayer money?

Even though it's rhetorical, I couldn't answer the first question without knowing what you mean by "justice" ... I suspect you're thinking more about vengeance, or at best, mere punishment. Regardless of the offense, the purpose of prison is supposedly threefold: to protect society, to punish the perpetrator, and to rehabilitate them. If you feel that the state cannot punish someone enough by merely locking them up, it doesn't seem like the biggest leap from that to justifying torture as an extreme form of state-sanctioned punishment.

And here's a rhetorical one back at you: Do you believe that a state killing someone can ever be just? I can think of scenarios where it might be the best option, but I don't believe it's ever just.

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