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Comment: Re:Distros don't matter (Score 3, Insightful) 791

by Eneff (#26718711) Attached to: Torvalds Rejects One-Size-Fits-All Linux

I would like to point out that Linus is against forking the kernel, and his group essentially demands a unified kernel and toolchain (with different distros having different configurations of these pieces).

[Citation Needed]

Torvalds's copy isn't deployed by most people. Red Hat does its own fork (or patchset), as does Ubuntu. TiVo certainly keeps its own copy. Andrew Morton has gone on record saying that a competing fork would be impractical, but I haven't seen anyone "against" such a thing.

If someone really wants to create a dependent sound system, I'm sure Mark Shuttleworth would like to hear from you if you can make the experience better.

Frankly, for most people, they can just use Ubuntu and forget about every other distribution on the desktop.

Music

+ - Apple cracks down on the Hymn Project-> 2

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Ever since the initial launch of the iTunes Music Store, an intrepid group of programmers over at the Hymn Project have engaged in a marvelous cat-and-mouse game with Apple. Now they're finally being hobbled by Apple's lawyers.

The purpose of the project has always been to provide software that can be used to losslessly remove Digital Rights Management (DRM) protection from music purchased through iTunes, so that the buyer may exercise their right of fair use and play the music on non-Apple devices (Hear Your Music aNywhere).

The software has gone through many incarnations. The original hymn has been succeeded by JHymn, QTFairUse6, MyFairTunes, and others. Regardless of the program, the emphasis has always been squarely on fair use — not piracy. Any discussions of piracy have been strongly and actively discouraged on the site's forums.

For years now, Apple has been content to mostly ignore the Hymn Project. At worst, they would introduce subtle changes to new versions of iTunes that would break the Hymn software. Nobody really knows if this was done intentionally, but it was usually just a matter of time before a new solution was found. This seemed like a reasonable approach for Apple to take. After all, why should they care? The DRM was only in place to placate the record companies. Apple CEO Steve Jobs has even expressed his opinion that all music should be free of DRM.

Well, now things have changed. Recently, a new program called Requiem was announced that appears to be a complete crack of the iTunes DRM scheme. Previous programs had relied on various forms of trickery or memory hooks to access the unencrypted audio data — none had ever completely cracked the encryption algorithms.

Requiem seems to have been the last straw. Earlier this week, the ISP hosting the site received a Cease and Desist order from Apple Legal, demanding that all downloads be removed from the site, and that the site post no links to any programs that could remove DRM from Apple music or video. Reportedly, similar C & D orders were also sent to at least one of the project's developers, and to another ISP where Reqiuem had been hosted. Ironically, Requiem was never actually hosted on the Hymn site — merely mentioned and linked to in one of the forums. Nevertheless, the Hymn Project has now come into the crosshairs of Apple's lawyers and, lacking legal resources, has seen no choice but to comply with the order."

Link to Original Source
The Internet

+ - Myopenid.com Creator on Live Skypecast 7PM EST

Submitted by
mprasad
mprasad writes "There's an OpenID Skypecast tonight at 7pm EST. The creator of myopenid.com and other developers working on OpenID projects will be available to take questions and hold an open discussion on about OpenID. More info at idCast.org. Given the recent announcements with AOL, Microsoft, and others behind OpenID, this could be a great way for the community to address concerns and possibly shape the way OpenID develops."
Book Reviews

Minimal Perl for Unix and Linux People 332

Posted by samzenpus
from the easy-does-it dept.
Ravi writes "Perl (Practical Extraction and Report Language) — the language which was created by Larry Wall is arguably one of the greatest programming languages. But it has a reputation for taking an excessive cryptic nature which gives it an image especially among Perl novices as a language which is complex and hard to master. Minimal Perl: for Unix and Linux people, authored by Tim Maher and published by Manning Publications addresses the obstacles presented by Perl's complexity. This book which is divided into two parts comprising of a total of 12 chapters takes a unique methodology to explain the Perl syntax and its use. The author emphasizes on Perl's grep, awk and sed like features and relys on concepts such as inputs, filters and arguments to allow Unix users to directly apply their existing knowledge to the task of learning Perl." Read on for the rest of Ravi's review.
The Internet

+ - The Unintended Consequences of NoFollow

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The nofollow attribute tells search engines to ignore a link when calculating the link destination's pagerank. Nofollow was promoted by Google to combat comment spam, but it didn't work — there's more spam on blogs than ever. A Wordpress founder conceded that nofollow has failed. But sites like Wikipedia are now using nofollow to suck up tons of link energy.

http://www.dailydomainer.com/200781-to-follow-or-n ofollow.html"

We don't know one millionth of one percent about anything.

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