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Comment: Re:Google (Score 1) 168

That's a nice perspective (and one I basically agree with) but the problem that's causing all of this is how abusive everyone has been with what little anonymity (or freedoms) we've had up to this point. Of course, money is always mixed into the equation as well, but for all intents and purposes, I'm focusing on the prior right now. Everything ranging from viruses, child porn, hacking into peoples' computers, hateful comments, spam, theft, intellectual property issues, etc., etc... It's all created a vortex of hassle that's dropped the value of allowing anonymity. Don't get me wrong: I hate it, too, when some damn website greets me with my Gmail username or something associated with my musical preferences or whatever but as long as people keep acting like dicks to everyone else, spouting off anti-Semitic this, burn in hell that; we'll keep suffering the consequences for it. We've evolved into a society (and infrastructure) that focuses on the morally-lowest common denominator, but even worse is the fact that we keep approaching the same problems with a quantitative mindset. This, I personally believe, is really the ultimate problem.

Comment: Re:I can predict the future (Score 1) 189

by Elminster Aumar (#45233185) Attached to: PHP.net Compromised
You could be right about the libraries, etc. that Java et al provide out-of-the-box... But here's the thing: nobody on Earth begins a web design project thinking to themselves, "Hey, let's make a website and put ourselves through the wonderful nightmare of being forced to learn some of the most Kafkaesque Java concepts we can find and completely disregard what we originally set out to do due to the poorly-written, overly complex, impossible system requirements that languages like Java et al bring with them." It never enjoys the accommodation of maintaining private criticisms due to how accessible it is anymore by everyone who owns a blog, but whenever I need something up and running--without spending countless hours just trying to create a simple web page--I'll always be turning to PHP. It's no frills, open-source, and yes, if you mind your Ps and Qs, is secure and efficient.

Comment: Re:I can predict the future (Score 1) 189

by Elminster Aumar (#45233131) Attached to: PHP.net Compromised
Depends on what the measurements are. How do you show how is better or worse than ? By the number of servers that use a given language? By the developers who have written code using the given language? By the volume of resources it takes to run something written in the language by developers who have at least and approximately 10+ years of proven experience? Generally-speaking, it's easy to assume that PHP developers outnumber the developers of other languages by a substantial amount. I'm not sure what the amount would be because I know there's a good number of Java guys out there as well as Perl. But here's the thing: PHP is ACCESSIBLE. You don't have to muck around with much to get it going--and working--for whatever requirements you may have. You don't have to mess with compiler scripts, libraries, etc. It's all just there, waiting to be used. What this means is that the ratio of seasoned programmers to inexperienced programmers as it pertains to PHP is likely to be unbalanced. This is unfortunate because there's nothing wrong with the language itself, at least, not when comparing it's shortcomings to the issues other languages did have at one point or another. The main point here is that the criticisms revolving around PHP's "accidents" are constantly made mainstream due to the sheer numbers of people who use PHP. This is both good and bad. It's bad for PHP in that it never makes it look any better, but it's good in how it shows just how many systems rely on it. Anyway, it's just like every other language out there: if you don't like it or have no use for it, then that's okay... Just don't use it. But spare us all the drivel where you go around spouting a bunch of immature *noise*. The internet has enough of this as-is.

Comment: Re:I can predict the future (Score 1) 189

by Elminster Aumar (#45233027) Attached to: PHP.net Compromised
The ratio of PHP developers to those in other languages are likely every bit 10-to-1. This means many things... First, it likely means that the accessibility to the use of the language is much more prone to being handled by people still new to the language, so yes, inappropriate use is likely to happen. Secondly, it means that the resulting issues surrounding security exploits, etc. will be much more mainstreamed than those that occur in other languages. All of this in mind, PHP is a fantastic language to use. It's no frills, accessible means provides everyone with a product that can do something and do something right there and then. You don't have to spend countless hours configuring compiler scripts, setting up a bunch of libraries, etc., etc. This goes without saying that yes, PHP has flaws but every language has flaws. So stop puckering your two year-old lip and go play with a language you prefer. Don't like PHP? Then don't use it. It's that simple. Stop letting your insecurities drive you to clamor about things other people love using. It makes you look immature.

Comment: Re:Thank goodness (Score 1) 999

by Elminster Aumar (#45153287) Attached to: US Government Shutdown Ends
It's unreasonable to expect everyone to drop what they're doing to go scurry off to wherever they can go to research Kafkaesque concepts pertaining to political minutia. People have too much going on in order to do this, but even if they didn't, an outcome of research (like that which you elude to) would require hours upon hours of thorough filtering through vague and often downright untrue literature just to get to the pieces that both A.) make sense and B.) are true. Long story short, I agree with you in thinking that people need to do better research to determine who they should vote for despite it being an unreasonable request approximately 90% of the time, but what's the point really when both candidates are worthless and never for the people 100% of the time!? The political system in this country is broken. The only thing we can do now is hold on for dear life and hope that our "leaders" either don't send us to the poor house or get us into a war. They're all worthless.

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