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Comment Re:Can Someone Help Me With the Budget Math Here? (Score 1) 225

I couldn't comment of the budget figures. But usually with international projects the project is required to spend the budget in-line with contributions it receives from it's members. So if the USA contributes 9 1/6 % of the budget, then the project has to buy 9 1/6 % of it's stuff from the USA. This usually adds a whole load of management overhead, along with making sure different stuff from different countries all works together. This, the delays, and that it is cutting edge science usually results in spiralling budgets and timescales.

The biggest winner in international projects tends to be the host country, as they end up with a load of boffins spending their pay in the area where the project is located. But everyone involved in the project benefits, after all the money doesn't just disappear, it is spent on employing folks to do things.

Comment No (Score 1) 731

Betteridge law of headlines applies:-

Betteridge's law of headlines is an adage that states: "Any headline which ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no." It is named after Ian Betteridge, a British technology journalist, although the general concept is much older. The observation has also been called "Davis' law" or just the "journalistic principle".


Comment Re:VMS (Score 1) 763


Fantastically consistent command line interface. Tools that were designed to do the job rather than just thrown together. Sadly the only current hardware OpenVMS runs on is iTanic. So it's days are numbered.

Comment Re:BeOS: still my favorite UI (Score 2, Informative) 448

I don't know how BeOS was engineered to achieve this, I only know that no other OS I used during and since then, achieved this sort of responsiveness.

Fine grained multi tasking, and avoiding mutexs. I think BeOS uses message passing to implement inter process communications. In engineering terms, it is the most modern desktop operating system.

Mirrors should reflect a little before throwing back images. -- Jean Cocteau