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Comment: Re:Operating at 20W gives zero improvement. (Score 1) 113

by DuckDodgers (#49127923) Attached to: AMD Unveils Carrizo APU With Excavator Core Architecture
I think for very cheap machines, if you take the cost difference between an AMD CPU + motherboard vs. Intel CPU + motherboard and put that cost difference into an SSD while the Intel box still has a traditional hard drive, then AMD is a good value.

And in fact, that's what I did with my wife's most recent computer. AMD A8-7600 + 12GB of RAM + 120GB SSD. Extremely cheap and it can still play Minecraft and Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 for my sons.

But if you were going to get an SSD anyway, plus 6+GB of RAM (more for a power user or developer or someone doing video editing or virtualization), then I agree with you. Paying the extra $100 to go from an $80 AMD "APU" to a $120 Intel i3-4160 and compatible motherboard will pay off in spades. Even the $70 Pentium dual core 50 watt G3258 kills any AMD processor this side of the overclocked 220 watt FX series chips for single-threaded performance.

Comment: Re:Oblig. XKCD (Score 1) 716

by DuckDodgers (#49043741) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?
Good point. I did mean to include that under the inferior and inadequate solutions options, but of course it does complicate things because finding a technical solution that works that also has your preferred combination of license and contributor license agreement is much harder than just creating a technical solution that works.

Comment: Re:Oblig. XKCD (Score 1) 716

by DuckDodgers (#49037715) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?
The Anonymous Coward a few posts back pointed that out to me already. I forgot the third possibility - that my fourteenth standard is at best no better than the best of the thirteen others and I have just made the situation worse. You and he or she are correct about that, and I'm sorry I didn't include it in my list of options.

Comment: Re:What do you mean, modern? (Score 1) 716

by DuckDodgers (#49037701) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?
Good luck. If you're familiar with Red Hat and CentOS, then Fedora may work too. I have Ubuntu on one machine and Fedora on another. I like a lot of Linux distributions, but I try to use the most mainstream ones so that if a casual Linux user among my friends or family has a question, I have up to date experience with something close to their setup.

Comment: Re:Some clarification for the recently arrived. (Score 1) 716

by DuckDodgers (#49037681) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?
Systemd is more work for you, someone with a broad depth of expertise in SysV init and shell scripts. For someone new to both, systemd is less work and provides all of the same features and advantages. Lennart Poettering is not a Red Hat executive or a Fedora guidance committee chairman - he and his team got systemd adapted by Fedora, then OpenSUSE, then Arch, then Debian, then Ubuntu, then CentOS based only on its technical merits.

Comment: Re:What do you mean, modern? (Score 1) 716

by DuckDodgers (#49037661) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?
I have encountered all of that information too. However, the situation has been improving. I can't say how much of that improvement is due to AMD and how much is due to open source developers that are good at reverse engineering. http://www.phoronix.com/scan.p... Also, I had those Minecraft crashes on Ubuntu 14.04, 14.10, and 15.04 alpha - that article I linked has kernel 3.18 (same as Ubuntu 15.04 alpha), Mesa 10.5-devel (15.04 alpha has 10.4.something), and open source radeon driver 7.4.99 (15.04 has 7.4.0). Maybe if I compiled my own driver and mesa I would get better stability, but I can't be sure.

I'm an AMD fan from way back because of the monopoly tricks Intel pulled in the late 1990s early 2000s ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.... ) - I figure Intel has the money and resources to put towards open source today because of the advantage they unfairly gained due to tricks then.

Comment: Re:What do you mean, modern? (Score 1) 716

by DuckDodgers (#49037569) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?
Thanks for catching my failure at reading comprehension. In any event, that still doesn't match what I'm seeing on Fedora 21. "journalctl -r -o verbose | grep -i 'priority=3' " gives hits, as does grep for priority 2. I'm not getting any hits for 1 or 0, but presumably that's because nothing has gone catastrophically wrong.

Comment: Re:Some clarification for the recently arrived. (Score 1) 716

by DuckDodgers (#49035469) Attached to: Is Modern Linux Becoming Too Complex?
1. systemctl-journal-gatewayd sends the digitally signed logs over https to another machine, same thing with all of the digital signing and security benefits.

2. Faster never hurts. There's no extra money made by waiting longer.

3. You wrote "A prod server should not be running piles of things". My point is with systemd you don't have to. I never said init did not also fit that criteria.

4. Sure. But it makes it easier. Just a few text file entries.

5. No, as far as I understand systemd socket activation the startup cost is incurred once on the first request, then after that the process keeps running. So best possible combination.

6. Again, less work to set all of this up. Just a text file.

7. Again, less work to get this feature. With systemd, you get this with "systemctl restart foo.service". No extra commands in every single init script for every single service to make sure all resources are closed down.

8. And you can keep writing them. systemd is compatible with init scripts. So what's the drawback?

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