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Comment Re:what KIND of wildlife? (Score 1) 113

what are you babbling about? are you trying to support the lame excuses of a neoimperial mafia country?

georgia, ukraine: invaded because they were neighboring weak countries. and russia just takes territory from them. it's living in 1815. the lame ass bullshit excuses for the thugging don't mean one fucking thing, except as a barometer of how many people are ignorant gullible retards who will believe lies

but russia is failing. it exercises it's military muscle because it is all it has left. but tanks rust, you need a strong economy to back up that military. and it's corrupt oligarch petrostate economy is crumbling, putin never diversified it. it alienates all it's neighbors it thugs on, it has no friends except other authoritarian jokes like kazakhstan and belarus. it's society is rife with authoritarian abuse: of the press, of freedoms of speech and sexuality, of political expression and to assemble. it's destroyed all political maturity and replaced it with immature cult of personality bullshit from north korea, centered around a kgb goon. when he dies, there's no mature succession because there's no mature political apparatus

so russia is at an end game. it will revolt and collapse. could take 20 years, could take 5. hey maybe they can make the 100 year anniversary in 2017. russia is a pathetic joke of a country that deserves all of the misery that is coming to it, because russians haven't learned a fucking thing since 1917, apparently. "we need big strong leader" yeah, actual strength doesn't work that way, complete morons

Comment Re:Hubris and Self-Interest (Score 1) 171

If you actually have a problem that decomposes nicely into lots of little, neatly contained, problems it might work really well. It's just that if you have that, you are among the blessed and probably don't need any fancy consultants in order to do just fine. You'd need somebody who is actively capable of pulling defeat from the jaws of victory to screw it up.

The sticking point is whether or not snake oil can dissolve seemingly insoluble problems into lots of little, neatly contained, problems.

Comment Re:Not a hard and fast rule... (Score 2, Interesting) 171

I don't know how broadly it can be applied(if it in fact works as well as they claim at all); but it would appear that the whole point of these 'microservices' is to produce smaller 'projects' so that you have more room to scale before complexity eats you alive. It's not so much a disproof of the 'mythical man-month'; but an adaptation to cope with it.

Getting purely linear scaling without some sort of zero-latency hive mind is unlikely to be possible; but it seems fairly obvious that the amount of overhead you incur by adding 20 extra people to a five man project is going to be rather higher than adding a second person to a one man project(though the jump between 1 person and 2 people might actually be pretty big, if helpful in terms of producing documentation that somebody other than the 1 person understands). If you can break your projects down into smaller pieces, with complexity better contained, and well defined interaction between the pieces, you have teams small enough that you might actually be able to make them faster by making them somewhat larger.

If your project is already a screaming heap of interlocking complexity, there simply isn't as much work that can be done in parallel. Aside from people stepping on each other's toes, there will just be a lot of "Part X can't be done until the guy doing Part Y finishes".

Not so terribly different(if likely to be even less predictable because humans are involved) than deciding how a problem will scale if you throw more computers at it. If your problem is actually a large number of mostly unrelated problems, it'll scale nearly perfectly. If your problem consists of lots of somewhat interconnected problems it will scale; but demands on interconnect will become increasingly expensive. If it's a purely serial problem, and each step depends on the prior step, it may not scale at all.

Comment Re:what KIND of wildlife? (Score 4, Informative) 113

chernobyl is actually in ukraine, just outside belarus

it was a soviet disaster (although the soviet union was merely a construct of russian imperialism, so it can be thought of as a russian disaster, so perhaps i'm just tweaking the meaning of your joke)

but like the holodomor ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... ), and the continuing vivisection of east ukraine and crimea, russians sure do treat their slavic brothers like shit

Comment Re:Issue is more complicated (Score 1) 714

To be fair, this issue really has almost nothing to do with Linux on the desktop. This is about the kernel mailing list. The kernel has been used successfully on Linux desktop systems for over 15 years now; it's really not holding anything up there. Most of it is a solved problem. There's some interesting work still going on there to be sure, but most of it is either for servers/high-performance computing or for embedded systems, not for standard desktops. There's nothing that can be done in the kernel that will magically make Linux a much more attractive option for the desktop.

Almost all the stuff that could be done to improve the desktop experience is in userspace, which by definition doesn't have anything to do with LKML: things like init systems, desktop environments, application software, distributions, etc. The main exception is graphics drivers, but even that isn't really a LKML topic, those things (like Nouveau) are pretty big projects by themselves and aren't conducted on the LKML. And of course, it should be obvious that the biggest impediment to Linux on the desktop isn't really technical at all, it's the availability of application software (though I suppose you could argue that improving WINE would make a big difference here).

Anyway, the point is, this issue is about only one part of the whole FOSS/Linux community; other projects don't have this notoriety.

Comment Re:Vote for Sanders? (Score 1) 249

well said

i was going to mention sanders, but i wanted to soft pedal it

there's still a knee jerk reaction to the word "socialism" in the usa that is something out of 1950s era joe mccarthy red scare hysteria

even though actual socialism: germany, denmark, canada, etc., simply means affordable healthcare and higher education. socialist countries are richer, happier, and freer than the usa (yes, freer: their representatives aren't purchased by plutocrats)

but if you say "socialism" to a moron of the american variety, they think communism. gulags and long lines for toilet paper

this is how you keep slaves: bury them in ignorant propaganda

Comment Re:ITT (Score 3, Insightful) 249

there is a mistaken notion that you have to devise a perfect solution to the problem before improving the problem

for example: we have laws against rape and murder. that doesn't stop all rape and murder, but no one is arguing that, just because we can't stop all rape and murder, we shouldn't have any laws against them. but we do have morons arguing that because we can't magically stop all corruption, we shouldn't try to minimize it

the point is to simply minimize the problem. the simple fact is that many nations do better than the usa in regards to controlling corruption and plutocrat interest. with very simple changes (simple in construct, i didn't say simple to achieve). for example: we pass laws that cut down on the election cycle funding by corporations and plutocrats. i'd argue the most destructive event against the usa, in it's entire history, worse than 9/11, worse than pearl harbor, even worse than the civil war, is the 2010 citizens' united decision. let's start by reversing that

a lot of whining at this point about how that's hard. because the right thing is hard to do is an argument against doing it? anything worth doing in this world is hard by definition. if it were easy, it would already be done. this is just lazy whiners

elect people that would promise to reverse citizen's united. i'm not saying it's going to happen in 2016. but every day people grow angrier and more aware of the problem. look at the interest in trump and sanders. these "protest votes" would usually fade by now in previous cycles. but people are really getting mad. at some point, a tipping point will be reached. this problem isn't going away, and is getting worse. not enough people are paying attention right now. but more and more are every day

really our biggest enemy is acceptance and cynicism. there's always people with bad intent in this world. they always need to be defeated. but instead of rolling up our sleeves and doing that, the perplexing and maddening thing is people who roll over and accept being robbed, and then rationalize their victimhood with cynicism. this is our real enemy: willing slaves

you will see this mentality in many comments in this thread and other threads on the topic of corruption and government. those people are the real reason we have our problems

Comment Re:Safety (Score 4, Insightful) 412

no evidence that arming the victims prevents mass shootings.

What's your next guess? Read and learn.

Besides Volokh's very informative research, I'll ask if you've ever hear of a country called "Israel"? There's a reason why the Palestinian terrorists gave up on trying to shoot up shopping malls and switched to half-assed rocketry.

1 in 5 chance that a mass shooting will use weapons the killer didn't own but obtained from gun owners on site.


Why is it that when you leftards pull a number out of your ass, you always go for 20%? That's just like the bogus claim that one in five women will get raped in college.


FORTUNE'S FUN FACTS TO KNOW AND TELL: A guinea pig is not from Guinea but a rodent from South America.