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Comment: Totally pointless. (Score 2) 197

by Draeven (#46325327) Attached to: US Carriers Said To Have Rejected Kill Switch Technology Last Year

I can already imagine how many times someone will lose their phone, then remotely break it only to find it later and hassle customer service to fix it.

Putting that aside, I just can't see this kind of security being useful or reducing actual thefts very much. I can't imagine there won't be a way to disable, remove, or otherwise bypass this remote wipe in some way.

+ - NSA planned to discredit radicals based on web-browsing habits->

Submitted by wired_parrot
wired_parrot (768394) writes "New documents leaked show that the NSA was not only monitoring suspected radical sympathizers, but planned to discredit them based on their web-surfing habits. This includes not only evidence of porn browsing and online sexual activity, as well as extorsion and blackmail based on innapropriate use of funds. At the same time, the document leaked notes that very few of contacts noted were associated with terrorism"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Copyright impedes creativity? (Score 1) 442

by Draeven (#44007259) Attached to: Birthday Song's Copyright Leads To a Lawsuit For the Ages

I don't think the length of copyright impedes creativity at all. Once something is in the public domain it's free to use in whole unchanged. Where's the creativity in that?

It's overly restrictive fair use rules that impede creativity. Allow a copyright holder to own their property perpetually should be fine, but loosen fair use laws so that things can be used and built upon.

Comment: Re:Smartphone a luxury or necessity? (Score 1) 572

by Draeven (#43369583) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Protecting Home Computers From Guests?

smartphones are all but the norm anymore

Then it appears you disagree with some other Slashdot users who have told me that smartphones are a luxury, not a necessity. The only necessity is an $80/year dumbphone in case of urgencies, and that's only because payphones are being removed. But I'm willing to consider your arguments as to why a smartphone is a necessity.

There was no usage of the words necessity or luxury in the post you were replying to. Something being "the norm" or not isn't related to whether or not it is deemed a necessity.

United States

+ - Paper trail and open source software vote imminent->

Submitted by
Spamicles
Spamicles writes "A vote is imminent for the bill that is a direct response to problems that occurred during the 2006 elections. This legislation would create a paper trail for elections, require a manual audit of every federal election, and open the source code of voting software in certain circumstances. The bill currently has 216 co-sponsors and is expected to be brought to the floor of the House and passed any day."
Link to Original Source
Handhelds

+ - Apple's dirty little iPhone secret?

Submitted by thefickler
thefickler (1030556) writes "Just a couple of weeks away from the June 29 release of the Apple iPhone, we seem to know everything about the world greatest gadget except the one thing that every mobile phone user really needs to know.

Given that anyone who wants to move over to an iPhone will also need to switch over to AT&T as their carrier, isn't it about time that Apple and AT&T came clean about how much it's going to cost to actually own the iPhone? Isn't about time that the details of the iPhone service plans were released so that consumers can make an informed decision?"
Editorial

+ - Soyo Honors Free Motherboard Rebate 3 Years Later->

Submitted by
Paul Lilly
Paul Lilly writes "My story begins nearly three years ago and concerns a company called Soyo. Newer enthusiasts aren't likely to recognize the name, but Soyo at one time churned out a line of motherboards, with their DRAGON series denoting the flagship models. One of the last boards to roll off the assembly line, Soyo's SY-P4I865PE Plus DRAGON 2 v1.0 advertised itself as a 'Prescott-Ready' slice of silicon riding the highly popular (at the time) Intel i865PE chipset. Further enticing would-be builders, the board carried a budget friendly $75 price tag, and though it wouldn't seem the pot needed any more sweetening, Soyo upped the ante by offering $75 in mail-in-rebates, in essence making it a free motherboard. Who could resist, right? Certainly not I, along with hundreds of others, and perhaps the overwhelming popularity is why things ultimately turned sour."
Link to Original Source
The Courts

+ - No anonymity for Colorado P2P defendants->

Submitted by
Pablo Saga
Pablo Saga writes "From Internet Cases: Finding that the RIAA and other record companies might not get access to precious data including the names, addresses and MAC address of unknown defendants in a new file sharing case, a federal court in Colorado has allowed the service of a special subpoena on Qwest so that the defendants can be tracked down. Colorado file sharers beware!"
Link to Original Source
Software

+ - Computer vision for people with regular computers?

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "So I finally got myself a nifty little webcamera, and naturally, the first thing I did was to look around the wide internets for cool computer vision things to do with it. I know the computer vision field has come pretty far, and I found what looks to be an excellent open source computer vision library (http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?grou p_id=22870) but for the life of me I cannot seem to find nifty apps, hacks and tricks to do with my web camera. So I Ask Slashdot — where are my face recognizing,
gesture interpreting, image vectorizing applications?"
Biotech

Human Genome More Like a Functional Network 304

Posted by samzenpus
from the nothing-wasted dept.
bshell writes "An article in science blog says we may have to rethink how genes work. So called "junk DNA" actually appears to be functional. What's more it works in a mysterious way involving multiple overlaps that seems to be connected in some sort of network." From the article: "The ENCODE consortium's major findings include the discovery that the majority of DNA in the human genome is transcribed into functional molecules, called RNA, and that these transcripts extensively overlap one another. This broad pattern of transcription challenges the long-standing view that the human genome consists of a relatively small set of discrete genes, along with a vast amount of so-called junk DNA that is not biologically active. The new data indicates the genome contains very little unused sequences and, in fact, is a complex, interwoven network. In this network, genes are just one of many types of DNA sequences that have a functional impact. "Our perspective of transcription and genes may have to evolve," the researchers state in their Nature paper, noting the network model of the genome "poses some interesting mechanistic questions" that have yet to be answered."

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