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Comment Code for yourself in your spare time (Score 4, Insightful) 516

I found that programming for a living does tend to take away the passion I used to have for it. To compensate, I tend to code for myself on my off time. I'd like to get into an open source project one of these days, but for now, I just write my own programs and enjoy the process.

You could get into an open source project, see if that might re-kindle your passion for programming. Make sure you check you company policy for code you write after work, you wouldn't want to run afoul of that.

Comment Winlink 2000 (Score 1) 308

Well, you could get your Amateur Radio license, then you could use Winlink 2000 to send and receive emails while at sea.

Of course, I personally despise Winlink 2000, because of the robots that never listen to see if other stations are transmitting, before they transmit, but that's just my personal opinion.

Comment Re:How long since you were in school? (Score 2, Informative) 417

I graduated from high school in 1977. The very first time I saw a calculator was in "A" school in the Navy, later on that year. I bought one at the Navy Exchange, can't remember the price. It was a Casio calculator, I can't remember the model number. We used to get drunk and use it to play music on our stereo in the barracks room. Tune an FM radio to an unused frequency, lay the calculator on top, and just press the buttons. The radio would pick up the frequencies, demodulate them, and play them back.

It was fun, but the music was somewhat limited ;)

Comment Re:After a half dozen distros (Score 1) 155

Slackware was my second distro, after Red Hat. I tend to flit around and change distros almost at will, but I am running Slackware 13.0 on my main desktop at the moment. I also ordered the 13.1 CD set, and will install that when it arrives.

I have to agree with the parent, I have certainly learned a lot about Linux from Slackware.

Understanding is always the understanding of a smaller problem in relation to a bigger problem. -- P.D. Ouspensky