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Comment: This is stupid (Score 1) 195

by DinZy (#44978741) Attached to: Justice Department Slaps IBM Over H-1B Hiring Practices

I would preferentially hire someone from India for a US job that would eventually relocate to India too, or wherever the job was meant to be. This is actually the best use of an H1B I can think of rather than flooding the market with more Chinese engineers. Most of the studies I have read seem to imply that there is no real shortage of talent for just about every technical profession.

Comment: Hire a damn physicist (Score 2) 401

by DinZy (#44260081) Attached to: Electrical Engineering Labor Pool Shrinking

"I came across one employer trying to combine a mechanical and electrical engineer" This employer is looking for an experimental physicist and does not know it.

On another note, I see the same thing in the semiconductor industry for process and integration roles. Everyone wants a perfect match, when the real perfect match is someone that can learn quickly because things are going to change a lot on as quick as a 2 year time scale. I had a recruiter call about an internal position I applied for and he was trying to ask how many years I have in some exact skill when, at the end of the day, that stat is not nearly as important as being able to learn. It makes it even more frustrating when the req is at the level of a new PhD grad and I already have 4.5 years industry experience.

Comment: So far not totally impressed. (Score 1) 332

by DinZy (#36464462) Attached to: Wii U Faster Than 360 Or PS3, No Blu-ray Or DVD Support

From the 'specs' it seems like it will only be marginally more powerful, though probably powerful enough for 1080p for the next 10 years or so. The fact that it can only support one tablet is also a bit discouraging. They should redesign it to support multiple tablets ( at least 2) by adding more power to each one or perhaps adding a second BT channel.

Comment: Re:Keep in mind (Score 1) 193

by DinZy (#32329680) Attached to: Physicists Do What Einstein Thought Impossible

Also keep in mind that they did not measure the speed and direction of a free Brownian particle. They confined it so it's not really the same problem. However I it is possible to watch a small fluorescent labeled protein molecule move around too. In that case if the protein is small enough and the concentration is dilute enough one can basically film their trajectories.

Comment: I have been downloading for over a decade (Score 1) 753

by DinZy (#32238194) Attached to: Why I Steal Movies (Even Ones I'm In)

I used to be the type of person who would get a full cable TV package and rent movies on VHS frequently, now I just download. I typically watch video downloads then delete some time later to free up space. Clearly someone is missing out on my business and I am not at all averse to paying for some content. When Netflix starts offering more streaming content in HD then I am there.

I think there needs to be a different model for current TV programs though. It's hard to sit through ads when one can simply download a tvrip with them all removed. Paying $2 per episode is not reasonable to me because, even in season packs, the costs can very quickly balloon to well over the cost of cable + a custom built DVR. There needs to be some flate rate service or some service with really cheap transactions for a single episode. I would stick ads in as a way cheapen the cost. Looking at superbowl ads as an extreme case, it costs advertisers 3 million bucks to reach a potential 100 million viewers, or 3cents per viewer, per ad. For a typical 1 hour TV program we get 18 minutes of ads, or 36 commercials. At superbowl prices this costs all the advertisers about1 dollar combined, for regular TV I am sure it is far less than that but it's a nice number to look at and gives a rough idea how broadcasters are actually making money. They are making a very small sum for each ad they are making you watch. Why not turn that around and keep the costs in the same ballpark? (Greed obviously, but let's pretend someone can see the benefit to not being so greedy)

There are many ways one could play around with this as all I am talking about is a video on demand service, but let's say it works like this. Subscriber pays some small monthly fee to sign up for streaming service, netflix or Hulu or what have you. This service allows you to purchase new premium content, ie new episodes of Lost, for a small, reasonable fee. Refund this cost if user agrees to watch ads. These ads can be targeted based on users demographics and there will be considerably less than 18 minutes per hour. Show monthly balance on some navigation bar that is always present except when watching content to influence viewer's decision. Display some sort of logo, or preview screen of all ads to be shown during program while viewer is deciding to watch for free or to pay for the ad free version. Charge advertisers for ads that are viewed, this can be done at a premium because they can be targeted and will have less competition. Charge them less for the logo in the preview screen, but do charge them. Pocket the money from those who pay for the ad free version. Yes it would take a long time to make something like this work, but with the right pricing I think it can work and it is a way that content providers can benefit from the internet rather than lose out.

Comment: Re:Biodiversity Is Priceless (Score 1) 129

by DinZy (#32227890) Attached to: Quantum Entanglement and Photosynthesis

I appreciate the idea, but it really doesn't apply to this particular case. Photosynthesis is not at all diverse. It is one of the many "designs" nature evolved that is used by countless species. I also find it hard to equate the development of quantum computers as a requisite for humanity's biological fitness.

Your comment only seems appropriate for the case when a drug is discovered in some plant or venom.

Comment: Yeah right (Score 1) 94

by DinZy (#32189548) Attached to: Researchers Create Logic Circuits From DNA

It's typical to overhype and exaggerate results like this. What's interesting is if it really is that easy to make reliable, robust, defect free logic circuits so easy, would it be a good thing or a bad thing economically. I'd certainly be out of a job if a grad student could magically mix up an SOC complete with electrical interconnects and packaging while his/her advisor slowly whittles away at his/her self esteem

Real Programmers don't write in PL/I. PL/I is for programmers who can't decide whether to write in COBOL or FORTRAN.

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