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Comment: Re:Challenge accepted! (Score 1) 358

by DiEx-15 (#47954189) Attached to: U2 and Apple Collaborate On 'Non-Piratable, Interactive Format For Music'

don't they realize when they make statements like "can't be pirated", a whole bunch of people reply with "challenge accepted!" and will go to great lengths to do so?

The better question is: How fast will those who say "Challenge accepted!" be able to complete said challenge?

Based on past data and general history: I'd give it a week, tops. That is of course my extremely high optimistic and perhaps overly generous projection.

Comment: Re:more power to him (Score 1) 286

as much as I don't care, some game companies need their hands slapped when it comes to false advertising. anyone remember simcity 4 multiplayer?

...Or EA's rendition of SimCity with it's "Not DRM but Online Features That Must Always Stay On The Internet Or The Game Won't Work At All Even If You Want To Play Single Player!" DRM.

Comment: Re:sega channel (Score 1) 75

by DiEx-15 (#47594131) Attached to: PlayStation Now, Sony's 'Netflix For Games' -- Pros and Cons

Anyone else remember sega channel for sega genesis? i think 11.99 got me unlimited games on it for the month (granted i only recall 5-8 games on it at a time, and they would rotate every month) Seems like a much better price structure to me. 9.99 a month to play whatever limited rotating catalog is there, i think a number of gamers would pay for that, but with the prices the way they are talking it will fail (after it makes moms and dads angry at their kids for their 200 a month gaming bill)

That isn't a fair comparison. Not everybody was able to get the Sega Channel because of technological limitations. Unlike now where Sony's crap is delivered via internet.

Case in point: I lived in Iowa (which is still in the stone age as far as I am concerned) when the Sega Channel came out. I asked the precursor for MediaConArtists (otherwise known as Mediacom, a Comcast offshoot) for it and they gave me herp derp about how they were unable to get it. Basically they said that they were limited, technology wise, from providing it. Granted, the channel didn't last long and it made sense that they didn't want to upgrade the system for one channel. Then again, they got assimilated by the MediaCon Borg a few years later and provided shitty "blazing speeds" that disconnect at random (or whenever they felt like it) for hours on end in my area.

Now at days: If your town can get internet via broadband, you can get Sony's deal. Provided of course the area in Iowa doesn't think Broadband is a witch that needs burned at the stake.

Comment: Re:Here's an idea! (Score 1) 203

by DiEx-15 (#47591341) Attached to: Nintendo Posts Yet Another Loss, Despite Mario Kart 8

It's 1983. Atari just settled a lawsuit over Activision's ability to create games for the 2600, and did not get a restraining order against the practice. Shovelware is running rampant, and many of the companies creating the shovelware are small startups. Games are not selling because they were overall fucking terrible. Stores lose a ton of money on having merchandise they couldn't sell. Many of both the distributors and developers are going of business. The distributors that are diversified and survive, like Toys 'R Us, refuse to use inventory space on games. It's a business decision they're making based on what happens when games are completely shitty.

In comes Nintendo with a way to ensure that truly shitty games don't make it onto their console, and they rejuvenate an industry that almost killed itself entirely with too much openness.

Again, this isn't some hypothetical bullshit argument about whether open source is superior on moral grounds from someone who holds no real stake in the outcome. It's what actually happened in the industry.

That seal didn't completely stop shitty games from hitting the NES/SNES but it did curtail a lot of "jackals" from doing damage.

Comment: Re:And this ... (Score 1) 178

by DiEx-15 (#47329377) Attached to: The Rise and Fall of the Cheat Code

Bigger publishers have now realized you can actually sell these things to players as DLC. Want that special gun? Think you can unlock it with a cheat code? Nope! You've got to give us some money first!

And this is why my XBox isn't connected to the interwebs.

I'm not interested in your damned in-game economy, and I have no interest in getting my ass kicked by a 12 year old playing on-line.

I'll stick with my off-line gaming, thank you very much.

I couldn't agree more!

Comment: Correlation == Causality Time! (Score 1) 154

Video games are the big evil. They are murderer trainers and hacking instructors. They fill our kids with all sort of evil ideas and shows them how to properly and easily do them in the real world.

Fucking twats. People been hacking non electric street signs since those have been coming out. And I'm pretty sure you'll find other peeps have been hacking electric sings way before this (I know I've seen them). What makes this big? Oh ya, a video game came out where you can hack signs. Easy to blame the game, since obviously video games are responsible for the shooting the other day also.

All this shit boils down to is somebody assuming Correlation = Causality. It's the exact same shit we hear when some kid goes nuts and shoots up a school. It's the exact same shit we hear when Political Party A wants to discredit Political Party B.

It's nothing new.

Some kid gets bored and for a few laughs does a readily available trick on some road signs. Rather than figure out ways to prevent it, it's much easier and cheaper to pin point some trivial bullshit and raise a fuss about it. So, naturally when they found out this kid played a video game about hacking they found a scapegoat and focused on that. Nevermind the fact this has been going on long before this game came out. By [Insert deity here or leave blank], that game is at fault because they don't want to face the responsibility that it's their own damned fault for not better securing such a trivial thing!

Comment: Re:The real plot problem (Score 1) 169

by DiEx-15 (#46853269) Attached to: Why Should Game Stories Make Sense?

The real plot problem is that not enough effort goes into game plot development.

I dunno - sometimes they over-do it, taking themselves way the hell too seriously.

I think the coolest game I ever played is still an old-assed text-based game. The game came with a scratch-n-sniff card, a 3D comic book (with glasses), and just enough 'plot' to get you started. The plot is is scare quotes because, quite frankly, it's intentionally stupid, silly, risque - but hellishly funny. The game itself required a ton of imagination on your part (because it was all text-based), and a lot of mental recall to avoid getting lost, killed, etc.

Even now, 2+ decades later, I still get a smile when I think of the so-called "plot" (it begins in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, then instantly puts you on Mars, etc...)

That aside, here's something else to consider: one of the absolute most popular games of the '90s was the Doom/Quake franchise, right? The 'plot' for Doom and Quakes I, II and III were thin at best, and let's be honest - it only got in the way of the real reason we all played Quake: Kill shit in realtime 3D and watch the gibs fly. The big 'plot' in the CTF/Team Foretress/WeaponsFactory MODs, and in CounterStrike and suchlike? Really - what plot?

I guess what I'm getting at is this: a plot is only useful sometimes - not all games need one, and if a game really needs a heavy, complex plot, then maybe it's just trying to cover for crappy gameplay?

To add to your point:

Pac-Man, Donkey Kong, Pong, Tetris: What story ? There is hardly one there, if any. Eat pellets, get high score. That is Pac-Man's story. Tetrris? None. Donkey Kong? A big ape stole your girl. Get her back. The end. Pong? Use paddle. Don't miss the ball.

The point is: Story is not that important in video gaming. The level of immersion and interaction and how a gamer does this is key in the suspension of disbelief in a game. A lot of times, gamers can't even remember the story, just that they did something in the game.

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