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+ - Linux-Compatible Video Recorder Recommendations

Submitted by David Greene
David Greene (463) writes "I'm looking for a good linux-compatible Handycam-like portable video recording device. The old one I have now does not have Linux support and does not use memory cards (tape only). Will most of today's cameras that use memory cards Just Work? Which cams do Slashdot folks like best when working with Linux?"

Comment: Re:Cause? (Score 1) 439

by David Greene (#42037027) Attached to: Global Warming On Pace For 4 Degrees: World Bank Worried

This.

Sure, warming might help Canadians save a bit on their heating bills but the soil at least in most of southern Canada is terrible for agriculture. It's a rocky landscape mostly undisturbed by glacial activity. I would like to know how much Canadian land would be viable for agriculture given various warming scenarios. I have a feeling it won't make up for the midwest U.S. breadbasket.

Comment: Re:False choice (Score 1) 238

PROTIP: It is 100% COMPLETELY IRRELEVANT who's the president. He's nothing more than a decorative veil of distraction. It could be your perfect dream candididate... It could be *you*... It's meaningless!

(Disclaimer: I work in the field.)

As do I. Frankly, your dismissal of the power of the executive makes me seriously question exactly what you do in this field. Obama has made a huge difference in important areas. Transportation is one of them. With an obstructionist Congress there's not much he can accomplish in the legislative arena but he can very well influence the way existing law is carried out.

No, I'm not delusional. I've seen and experienced the difference Obama has made. Personally.

Comment: Re:False choice (Score 5, Informative) 238

I fundamentally disagree with your analysis. It displays a lack of understanding of political power and Obama is neither a Marxist or a Socialist. But that's not what I want to address today. What we need to address is this:

Obama and Romney differ very little when it comes to the actual issues

You're kidding, right?

One pushed through a big health care reform which will cover millions of uninsured people while the other is moving as far away from his (mostly identical) program as possible.

One believes that progressive taxation is essential to prosperity. The other has done everything he can to make the tax system regressive.

One believes we need to regulate the financial sector to ensure stability. The other has pledged to tear down what little regulation we have.

One has invested in renewable energy and the other says he will fund "traditional" energy sources and dismantle decades of environmental law.

One may agree or disagree with the candidates on these points but one cannot honestly say there is no difference between them.

Comment: Re:And now, the long wait (Score 1) 923

by David Greene (#41016405) Attached to: Ecuador Grants Asylum To Julian Assange

Oh please. The man sexually assaulted multiple women. He does not deserve asylum.

He also leaked private diplomatic documents. He should expect to get arrested. All honorable practitioners of civil disobedience expect to be arrested and spend time in jail.

Assange is a narcissistic attention-grabber with serious sexual predator characteristics, nothing more.

Comment: Re:Wrong (Score 1) 745

by David Greene (#40007303) Attached to: Ron Paul Effectively Ending Presidential Campaign
You don't seem to understand the tremendous power the executive has. The president doesn't just sign laws, he gets to execute them. Thus, the Executive Branch. That means he gets to decide how they are implemented (laws are intentially left vague), gets to decide how many resources are dedicated to implementing them, sets general policy, etc. An examination of the history of, say, transportation in this country would be most enlightening, I think. The Executive branch has wide-reaching powers. That's why it matters.

Comment: Re:correlation != causation (Score 2) 311

by David Greene (#39558943) Attached to: Confidentiality Expires For 1940 Census Records

Every dollar the government spends is a dollar taken from the free market.

No. Those dollars are used to hire contractors, etc., all from your "free market," which is just "the market." There is no separation between government spending and any other spending. It all goes to the same places.

Comment: Re:Gas (Score 1) 651

by David Greene (#39026153) Attached to: Last year, I spent the most on ...

You're not the only one. Transportation is often a larger part of a family's budget than housing. This is because we've built our transportation system almost exclusively on roads and our metropolitan areas almost exclusively around sprawl. It's no wonder people are driving further than ever to get to work and paying more for their car than their house.

Comment: Re:Hmm (Score 2) 857

by David Greene (#38914811) Attached to: How the GOP (and the Tea Party) Helped Kill SOPA

This is flamebait but I'm compelled to respond.

Racism is a pretty damned weak excuse for this. I mean really someone explain it to me - how does a "racist" thought in a white man's mind force a black man to abandon his children?

Because racism is not "thoughts." I find it helpful to distinguish bigotry from racism. I consider bigotry to be in the realm of individual thoughts. Racism is about power. Racism is more about social constructions than individual thoughts and actions. For example, Jim Crow laws are racist.

Racism is indeed the cause of your observations. Education disparity is a gigantic problem in this country. It's difficult to overcome because we have several centuries of public policy in place that closed educational opportunities to people of color. We've eliminated most of the official policies but we have hundreds of years of effects of those policies to undo. Simply fixing the law isn't enough. We've set an entire class of people on a certain track for hundreds of years and it will take active undoing of that to set them on a different track.

When you don't have access to basic education, you don't have access to higher education. If you get rid of the legal barriers now you have to deal with all sorts of cultural issues such as teachers not understanding your background and experience as a person of color, lack of teachers who have shared that experience and so on. This is very complicated stuff, not easily changed by simply repealing some laws. Maybe you'll dismiss it as "touchy-feely" nonsense but I assure you that every person of color I've engaged around this stuff tells me it's real, whether they are Black, Hispanic, Asian, Native American or whatever.

Drug and alcohol abuse follows. When you have little hope to get a job because demonstrated bias in employment still exists, what motivates you to even try? That's not an excuse, it's simply reality. Some blame it on "inferior culture" or similar nonsense but imagine growing up and seeing your grandfather, your mother, you father, your brother and your sister treated like dirt. I don't know about you, but that would get to me.

I will honestly say I struggle with the single mother family statistics. My wife and I talk about this from time to time, trying to figure out where that comes from. I don't know. But when I see a strong trend in a group, I tend to think that there is something deeper driving that trend than simply a culture of irresponsibility. We have to ask ourselves why we observe what we do, not simply blame people for the observation.

They are a broken people, unfortunately, and only they can fix themselves.

There's that bigotry thing. Start passing laws motivated by an attitude like that and it becomes racism. No people is "broken" and the poor and opporessed can rarely help themselves.

Comment: Re:Oh yes, software (Score 1) 630

by David Greene (#38842561) Attached to: America's Future Is In Software, Not Hardware

Actually, a lot (maybe most) hardware is not a commodity. We still build a lot of hardware here in the U.S. All kinds of embedded gadgets get designed here and a good number of them are manufactured here. They are quite profitable. A lot of supercomputing hardware is still built here and almost all of it is designed here.

While I agree that software is important (and lucrative) we can't just give up on building hardware. At the very least, doing so has a bunch of national security implications.

Comment: Re:But what does it sound like? (Score 1) 101

by David Greene (#38786587) Attached to: A Data Center That Looks Like a Mansion

The core cities were in no way "shut down" during or after any storm last year. Frankly, I was amazed how well the city crews did given the parking challenges they face that suburban municipalities generally don't. I live in Minneapolis very close to downtown. We were fully functional throughout the winter.

Minnetonka is a big city, geographically. While you're right that not all of it is super-wealthy, almost all of it is wealthy. And while the eastern border is about a 20 minute drive from Minneapolis, reaching the lake takes at least 40 minutes from Minneapolis without traffic so it's not exactly close.

This is a data center. There is absolutely no reason it needs to be physically close to its customers. I don't think there are many large corporate headquarters near where this thing would be. The Golden Triangle in Eden Prairie is possibly the closest, or perhaps the Carlson Towers area. I totally believe the tax writeoff scam explanation. It's clearly a way to rig the system to suck even more money out of the general welfare.

Never invest your money in anything that eats or needs repainting. -- Billy Rose

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