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Comment Re:Market Failure (Score 1) 776

"The classic market failure is that some participant (it could be a firm, it could be consumers) is making decisions based on incomplete or inaccurate information. They're arguing that in this case, it's the consumers." I'm sorry, but doesn't everybody know that you get fat and unhealthy if you eat too much unhealthy food and exercise too little? I don't see how anybody is uninformed about this. So I would say that their angle is false.

Comment Re:Market Failure (Score 1) 776

I agree with you, but shouldn't people who have an unhealthy diet pay for the medical consequences of that diet themselves? I know it sounds a bit hard, but everybody knows that eating a lot of fat food everyday is very unhealthy. Yet some people choose to do it anyway. And they get away with it from a financial point of view because government externalises those costs to you and me. I just think that people should pick up the bill of their own voluntary, informed, unhealthy lifestyle.

Comment Market Failure (Score 1) 776

I fail to see what market failure has to do with this. People want big hamburgers with fries and a diet coke, and they get it. Seems like a healthy market to me. Its the people that are less then healthy, not the market.

Comment Re:Obvious weird Windows comparison (Score 1) 639

First of all, Flash itself is bloated, which is as true for Linux as it is for Windows. Second the Windows scheduler gives the highest priority to the application who's window has focus. The Linux scheduler on the other hand tries to be as fair as possible to all the processes. You see, the thing is Windows was/is designed to be a desktop OS, while Linux was/is designed to be a server OS.

We're here to give you a computer, not a religion. - attributed to Bob Pariseau, at the introduction of the Amiga