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Comment: Re:Sources? (Score 2) 628

by CurlyG (#43468149) Attached to: Windows 8.1 May Restore Boot-To-Desktop, Start Button

Totally agree with you regarding moronic UI designer arrogance. It is the same attitude that gives us 'mobile' versions of websites (often without any way back to the normal version than changing the User Agent string in your device's browser) which disable zooming. The only justification I've heard is that it 'preserves the integrity of the design' which matters not one fucking iota if the user can't actually see the content that the design is meant to be presenting.

Privacy

+ - Aussie Software Pirate Extradited to USA

Submitted by
rjodwyer
rjodwyer writes "Hew Griffiths, an Australian is has been extradited for trial in America for crimes committed outside of the USA, and to a country to which he has never set foot in. Leader of the infamous Drink or Die cracking group, he has been extradited to the USA, in what only seems to be Australia bowing under pressure from America. As Australian Senator Ellison had the power to refuse extradition, this looks like Australia handed him over to satisfy corporate interests in America. His fellow crackers had their trials conducted in their own countries."
The Almighty Buck

+ - Steve Jobs highest paid CEO - $646 Mil

Submitted by
Whiney Mac Fanboy
Whiney Mac Fanboy writes "Fans of Apple CEO Steve Jobs are quick to point out that he is only paid a $1 salary for his role at Apple. However, according to Forbes he's the highest paid executive in the US — to the tune of 646 Million dollars for 2006. From the article

Forbes said the highest-paid CEOs were not always those that delivered the most to shareholders.Forbes said by its analysis, Apple's Jobs was 36th. Topping the list was John Bucksbaum of General Growth Properties, a real-estate investment trust. Over the past six years, Bucksbaum was paid $US723,000 a year while delivering a 39 per cent annual return to shareholders.
I wonder how much of that $646 Million was from improperly backdated options?"
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Goofy to upgrade his media room

Submitted by
aluminumangel
aluminumangel writes "I'm ecstatic over the news that Disney is back to producing shorts in good-old fashioned 2D cell animation. One of the first shorts to debut this fall is Goofy in "How to Hook Up Your Home Theater." Yes, a return to the classic "how to..." series! Remember when Goofy (or multiple Goofies) would attempt a sport or pastime — with a dead-pan/throat-clearing/stuffy narrator providing instruction? It is back! We could see Goofy try to figure out 1080i vs. 1080p and component cables vs. HDMI cables... will he choose plasma or LCD? I don't know, but Goofy seems more like a LCoS guy to me. I can't wait until Goofy demos his new room! Let me venture a guess and say that Goofy will choose Blu-ray over HD-DVD."
Space

+ - Speed key to all galaxy formation

Submitted by
QuantumCrypto
QuantumCrypto writes "The All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS), a collaborative effort involving nearly 100 scientists in half a dozen countries, revealed a new principle in the formation of all galaxies, from disk-like spirals, cloud-like ellipticals, and just irregulars. In essence the morphology of the galaxies depends on total mass involved and the internal speed it generates. "By defining a new speed indicator, their analysis has managed to make sense out of very chaotic-looking objects", said Sandra Faber, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz."
User Journal

Journal: A dollar for Apple is a vote for the Democrats? 65

Journal by Whiney Mac Fanboy

In the long lead up to the US Presidential Elections, there is something that I'm curious about.

How do slashdotters (and particularly conservative slashdotters) feel about Apple's overt and unequivocal support for the Democrats? If you're not sure what I'm talking about, consider the following:

Windows

+ - Live for Windows priced identically to Live on 360

Submitted by Xisiqomelir
Xisiqomelir (735729) writes "Game Informer reports that Microsoft, at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, has unveiled its pricing scheme for the upcoming Live for Windows....as identical to Live on Xbox 360. Are PC owners, who have historically had free online multiplayer, going to embrace a $50 yearly subscription for access to that feature?"
The Courts

+ - Third Level Domain Legal Issues

Submitted by
MikeB
MikeB writes "This is my first post ever, so please excuse any etiquette errors. I have a question for the lawyer types.

My company is looking into third level domain names (i.e. XXXXX.website.com), and has raised the issue of using trademarked (or otherwise legally protected) names in that third level slot. Our intent is to use the model numbers of the hardware that our software works on in the thid level area to specify a landing page for each model. Since those model names/numbers are owned by a separate company, does that open us up to legal ramifications if that company decided to press charges? I checked with Network Solutions (www.networksolutions.com) and they told me that there were no legal ramifications, but I wanted to check with the larger community.

So the main question: Do we open ourselves up to legal attacks by using the aforementioned names in the third level domain slot of our company's website? Thank you for any help you guys can give."
Data Storage

+ - 161 Billion Gigabytes of Digital Information

Submitted by dthomas731
dthomas731 (761616) writes "The New York Times states that 161 billion gigabytes or 161 exabytes of digital information was created last year. Then they do their best to explain what "161 billion gigabytes" represents.

"That's like 12 stacks of books that each reach from the Earth to the sun. Or you might think of it as 3 million times the information in all the books ever written, according to IDC. You'd need more than 2 billion of the most capacious iPods on the market to get 161 exabytes."
Personally, I can't comprehend something that large. How would you describe it?"
Programming

+ - What's it like for a developer to go into sales?

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "I've worked for a single, very large technology company since graduating from college in '89. My degree is in Computer Science, and I wrote everything from embedded machine code for big iron to applications with Smalltalk. I'm still in development, but since'99 my programming tasks have been replaced by project management, some customer-facing work (technical-ish presentations, demonstrations, training, etc), helping our marketing people position my team's work, and other things that programmers generally don't like to do.

I find that I enjoy the broad, technical perspective that comes from working in the field, and I'm thinking about moving out of development and into technical sales. Moreover, I've interviewed several techies in my company who are now in sales and all tell them they love it. Several have reported that a techie can make more money in sales. But I have several reservations: I am an introvert and a full day of face-time can really sap my energy, many sales people I've worked with are "sharks" (which I simply cannot be), and I don't like the idea of putting part of my salary at-risk.

Are you a former developer who went into sales? If so, what were your experiences like from a professional and personal perspective? What advise would you give to a developer considering a new career in sales?"
Intel

+ - Intel releases 4004 microprocessor schematics

Submitted by
mcpublic
mcpublic writes "Intel is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the Intel 4004, their very first microprocessor, in a way they've never done before, by releasing the chip's schematics, maskworks, and users manual to the public for non-commercial use. This historic revelation was championed by Tim McNerney, who designed the Intel Museum's newest interactive exhibit. Opening on November 15th, the exhibit will feature a fully-functional, 130x scale replica of the 4004 microprocessor running the the very first software written for the 4004. To create a giant Busicom 141-PF calculator for the museum, 'digital archeologists,' Fred Huettig, Brian Silverman, and Barry Silverman, first had to reverse-engineer the 4004 schematics and the Busicom software. Their re-drawn and verified schematics plus an animated 4004 simulator written in Java are available at the team's unofficial 4004 web site. Digital copies of the original Intel engineering documents are available by request from the Intel Corporate Archives. Intel first announced their 2,300 transistor 'micro-programmable computer on a chip' in Electronic News on November 15, 1971, proclaiming 'a new era of integrated electronics.' Who would have guessed how right they were?"

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