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Comment: Re:How is it their fault? (Score 5, Insightful) 653

by Cheviot (#45753101) Attached to: Protesters Block Apple and Google Buses In California

I don't agree with the protesters, but their argument is that by providing these busses, Apple and Google are encouraging their employees to live in the area the busses service.

Previously the employees would have chosen to live somewhere convenient, but more expensive, due to the need to drive themselves. Now the Apple and Google employees can buy up places near the bus routes, causing a mini-housing shortage and driving up prices, thus pricing locals out of the housing market

Comment: Re:Right choice (Score 2) 684

The law requires that to hire an H-1B visa holder that the company must certify that there is no American that qualifies for the position. It doesn't matter if the Bangladeshi is qualified or not. If the American was qualified the firm broke the law by hiring the H-1B visa holder.

Reacting to a company breaking the law by filing a lawsuit is the right thing to do.

Comment: Re:As I and many others pointed out yesterday (Score 1) 539

by Cheviot (#35667956) Attached to: Amazon's Cloud Player: We Don't Need a License

And a completely trackable one. Amazon doesn't give these accounts to just anyone. You have to create an account with them and, it appears, have purchased something from them. They have the offender's name, address and payment information.

I don't imagine they'd hesitate to turn you in to protect their service.

Comment: Re:As I and many others pointed out yesterday (Score 5, Informative) 539

by Cheviot (#35666928) Attached to: Amazon's Cloud Player: We Don't Need a License

This is a different situation than my.mp3.com. In that case the website stored one copy of each piece of music, required the user to verify they owned it, then allowed you access to their stored copy. This was found to be actionable as they were allowing multiple people to download one master copy of a MP3, essentially repeatedly pirating that MP3.

Amazon is establishing a separate cloud drive for each user. If you buy a MP3 they copy it to your personal drive for you. They also allow you to upload your music to that drive. There is a separate copy of each song stored on the cloud drive for each user, and the only MP3s Amazon copies to the drive are legally purchased. As the user can only download what they have uploaded or purchased, no piracy occurs, at least on Amazon's part. Users may be storing pirated music on their personal cloud drives, but these are private file storage areas and do not allow MP3s to be exchanged among users, thus the cloud drive does not facilitate piracy.

Linux Business

Is LGP Going the Way of Loki Software? 124

Posted by Soulskill
from the bad-news-bears dept.
An anonymous reader writes "After the demise of Loki Software, Linux Game Publishing sprouted up in its place, and for the past nine years has ported a number of games to Linux. But LGP may now be sharing the same fate as Loki. Linux Game Publishing hasn't updated its blog or news pages in months, has stopped responding to e-mails, and its only active ports are games they began work on in 2002/2003."

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