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Chacham's Journal: What temperature do you like? (Fahrenheit) 12

Journal by Chacham

What temperature do you like? I believe I have read that women tend to want it warmer than men. I also notice that most people want to be warm during the winter and cold during the summer. Go Figure.

Personally, I prefer between 65-68 depending on my mood and what I am doing. When I'm eating or sleeping I prefer the higher-end. Though, normally, I prefer the lower end. I find 70 acceptable, but above that to be warm. At 72 I begin to get drowsy, and very likely will not be able to function at full capacity. At 74 I'm really warm, and at 78, I'll pretty much blank out if tired at all. Though, I can easily handle under 65.

What's with you?

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What temperature do you like? (Fahrenheit)

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  • Heh, here in Texas we will get up to a good 108 in the summer, so any of the aforementioned temperatures are fine with me.
  • by FortKnox (169099)
    I prefer to sleep in a warm bed, with a warm atmosphere. During the day, however, I can go on in a balmy 60-68 degrees.

    My wife is exactly the opposite. She likes it warm during the day and cold at night.

    So the temps rotate.
  • but my girlfriend is usually cold. We have a heated blanket that she (ab)uses every night. In the morning, it is usually me wrapped up in a sheet, and her with a pile of blankets over her.
  • I think you're right on with the gender thing; men tend to be more comfortable at cooler temperatures, while women like it warmer. My theory is that it's a surface-area-to-volume-ratio thing. Girls typically have a higher SA:V ratio, which means they have a harder time staying warm at a given room temperature.

    Me? If the temperature rises much above 76 F, I tend to get drowsy if I'm sitting still, or I tend to start to perspire if I'm active. I'm good down to the low 60's, though.
    • Does that make me an anomaly?

      Once it's above 75 in a room, I'm not happy. Ideally, I'd keep any room no higher than 65. Sleeping, I prefer near 50. I generally have my windows open through the winter.

      • I think I'm the anomaly, since I like it slightly warmer when I sleep. But 65 room temperature, I like that.

        On Monday I have some work to do. From what I understand, the building has not yet turned on the a/c and the office has no openable windows. So, if the sun comes up, I'm toast. I'll bring a big fan just in case though.
  • 60 degrees if I'm doing anything remotely physical, even lower for more strenuous activities. If I'm just sitting around, 70 is comfortable but I can put some pants on if it dips below 65 or so. Sleeping I like it very cool, around 50 degrees.

    If the temperature gets uncomfortable, usually I just adjust my clothing accordingly. It's only when it gets hot ( > 87) that I start to have problems.
  • Well, let's just suffice it to say that I'd like to move to Hawaii or Guam. Wife isn't up for it though- too warm for her :-(
  • I am cold blooded btw :)
  • though i prefer cold if the hot comes with humidity. if the cold is colder than about 20 F than it really doesn't matter because i still don't want to be outside.

    i like it cool, with maybe a high around 70-75 and 40's to 60's for an overnight low. for sleeping, i like it cool, but with a warm blanket. my favorite season is autumn, followed closely by spring.
  • I like it cool, especially at night. It's right now 70 in here and I'm wearing a t-shirt and non-long pants.

    However, I grew up in a home that was rarely heated (my bedroom was never heated) and I guess that's how I've adjusted to the cooler temps, but I'm still quite fridgid when I visit my folks. 40 degrees in your bedroom in winter (for a high temp) is something to be afraid of. And to those thinking "well, at least it's not windy" I answer that it sure gets drafty... not like blowing papers around, b

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