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Comment: Submarines Move (Score 2) 75

by Catmeat (#46584803) Attached to: Physicists Produce Antineutrino Map of the World
Nuclear submarines move. So if the experiment is run for long enough, then the skew caused by having one pass by in the nearest stretch of ocean won't be a worry.

Saying that, I imagine various navies and intelligence agencies will be paying a great deal of attention to this research, if they're not already doing so.

Comment: Re:nitpicking nomenclature (Score 4, Informative) 66

by Catmeat (#46556505) Attached to: Goodyear's New State-of-the-Art Airship Makes Its First Flight

They contain gasses in the envelope that is lighter than air but not enough to provide sufficient buoyancy for lifting the entire weight of the craft. They'd technically be still heavier than air and would require the engines running to leave the ground. I don't know if the Goodyear airships are lighter or heavier than air.

You're right, I believe Zeppelin NTs are several hundred kilos heavy on take-off, when carrying payload and full load of fuel. Though they can be lighter than air when landing with the fuel mostly gone. Of course the other big complication to trimming a dirigible is air conditions, which can change during the flight. Buoyancy increases significantly if an airship flies from warm air into a bank of colder, denser air and the craft will remain buoyant until the helium cools to match the air temperature. In the old days, air

All this is what makes vectored thrust a fantastically useful thing for an airship pilot. It gives better control and also means the pilot can vector thrust up to land when his/her craft is lighter-than-air. I'd say this is vital for keeping costs down, as it avoids venting helium for landing.

Although the usefulness of vectored thrust was no lost on the early designers. See this picture of a pre-World War 1 British military blimp with rotatable props.

Comment: Re:As an organiser of events. (Score 1) 469

by Catmeat (#45776715) Attached to: Is the World Ready For Facial Recognition On Google Glass?

I'd love facial recognition. I have a really bad memory for names and faces, and I often end up in the embarrassing situation of meeting someone in the street who knows who I am but I only vaguely recognise their face and certainly don't remember their name. Having a prosthetic "face to name" system would save me from many embarrassing situations.

No, I'm fairly certain you have a memory for names/faces not much better or worse than anybody else.

It's just that people who appear to be better at it than you are simply more aware if its importance and, have gone to the trouble of employing various memory aids and tricks to help them do it effectively.

I'm speaking as a snowboard instructor, who must memorise the names of a class of 12 more-or-less instantly on introduction to them at the start of the first lesson. Because teaching a class without being able to address individuals by name is noticeably harder.

Comment: Re:First (Score 1) 250

by Catmeat (#45693907) Attached to: Chinese Lunar Probe Lands Successfully

Interesting addendium to the interesting addendoim....the Daily Expresses' actual Muirhead picture receiver, that got plugged into the big dish at Jodrell Bank, still survives and is preserved in the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester.

Check here http://www.watermargin.com/vietmain/speed/speed.html if you want to hear what the signal from a Muirhead sounds like, and presumably what the people at Jodrell actually heard coming from the moon.

Comment: I feel sorry for North Korea (Score 1) 302

by Catmeat (#45079641) Attached to: New High Tech $100 Bills Start To Circulate Today

I feel sorry for North Korea - what are they going to do for hard currency now, unless can catch up with this?

Though saying that, the $100 is essentially an Asian currency as that's mostly where it circulates. Not a bad thing for the US - they get $100 for printing each one, the bills disappear overseas forever and so never contribute to US inflation.

Comment: Re:There, fixed that for ya (Score 1) 110

by Catmeat (#44957693) Attached to: Existing Drugs Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs

Here's a hint: Stop indiscriminately throwing antibiotics at everything that moves. It's precisely the over-use of these drugs that has created the problem in the first place.

Why would pharmaceutical companies want to do that? As maximising profit presumably requires them to maximise sales of their products, and hence maximise usage.

Comment: Comercial Use (Score 2) 333

by Catmeat (#44691669) Attached to: Nissan Plans To Sell Self-Driving Cars By 2020

Will autonomous vehicles have to have a driver on board? If not then delivery companies would love the idea of sacking all theirs. The public might not like having to fetch their parcels from a truck pulled up on the street outside their house, rather than have them delivered to the door, but meh.

Another thought, how long after the technology becomes commonplace before the first non-suicide truck bomb? If I can think it up, then presumably the security apparatus can also, and is right now considering this possibility; it'll be interesting to see what rules and restrictions come into force to try and prevent it.

Comment: Digression (Score 4, Insightful) 313

Online is just one of many ways to meet someone initially... it still takes a shitload of work to make it work.

Bit of a digression, but during the UKs recent Gay Marriage debate, an awful lot of conservative/religious commentators were spouting endlessly about how 'natural' marriage is.

If that's so, why do married people always go on about what hard work it is. Surly 'natural'='easy'.

Comment: Re:they are doing it backwards! (Score 1) 230

by Catmeat (#43588853) Attached to: UK Passes "Instagram Act"
Can you imagine how pissed-off Disney would be if Song of the South , the full version of which has never been released on US home media, suddenly went public domain because it had never been released?

While that idea means companies wouldn't necessarily lose profit, the fact they would lose control (and the ability to suppress undesirable works) would mean they'd hate it and lobby heavily against it.

"Just the facts, Ma'am" -- Joe Friday

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