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Comment: Re:When they test these autonomous cars... (Score 1) 167

by Bonobo_Unknown (#48750131) Attached to: Mercedes-Benz's Self-Driving Concept Car Is Here

That's why there's still controls to drive it non autonomously.

And if that is the response, that is why autonomous cars will NEVER work on public roads.

Either the car drives itself 100% of the time, or I drive it 100% of the time.

If someone thinks that you're going to be driving along in your car not paying attention to the road, and suddenly the computer is doing to say "fuck it, I don't know, you do it" they're complete morons.

It sounds silly but that's exactly how autopilot and fly by wire systems work in Airbus and Boeing aircraft and they have hundreds of passengers at a time.

Comment: Re:When they test these autonomous cars... (Score 1) 167

by Bonobo_Unknown (#48750115) Attached to: Mercedes-Benz's Self-Driving Concept Car Is Here
>If someone thinks that you're going to be driving along in your car not paying attention to the road, and suddenly the computer is doing to say "fuck it, I don't know, you do it" they're complete morons. It sounds silly but that's exactly how autopilot and fly by wire systems work in Airbus and Boeing aircraft and they have hundreds of passengers at a time.

Comment: Re: Its a cost decision (Score 1) 840

It's not about cost. It's about design. They used to build things to last.

Did they really? Then why isn't our world still full of old working things that require no maintenance? I mean I can agree with the impression that things used to be built to last, but I think it might have more to do with the fact that old things were put together by hand, and were very big and electronic components were big and simple. It used to be easy to find a faulty component and fix it, but now that everything's been shrunk and stuck on a chip it's no longer simply a matter of replacing a universally available component, you have to find and buy the correct chip, which can cost more than just going down to the shop and getting a new entire product. Old things are still around and have the fame of being reliable because they are simple to fix.

Comment: Re:Liberia Population (Score 1) 280

by Bonobo_Unknown (#47980037) Attached to: CDC: Ebola Cases Could Reach 1.4 Million In 4 Months
The mitigating factor is that we don't have to start from scratch, we have the knowledge to survive in an energy poor environment, we know what minerals we need and where to find them. Yes we might only be able to find a very small percentage of what we used to but we should be able to find power to supply critical infrastructure and further research into alternative energy once the plug on mainstream energy is pulled. It's true to say life as we know it would end, but that might just mean we're not so consumer oriented.

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