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Comment Re:I've said it before (Score 1) 391 391

and I'll say it again - technology INCREASES jobs, never decreases it - over the long term.

If robots don't cause total human working hours to decline, then what the fuck good are they?

In this instance it's not about reducing human working hours, it's about increasing productivity. Factories might increase productivity exponentially with robots and yet still require about the same number of staff either working around the edges where robots aren't capable or managing the robots themselves. But the point is that you're producing much more with about the same labour cost.

Comment Re:Price is a second order function (Score 1) 292 292

I think the best solution has been around for a hundred years, albeit in a children's toy, how about we drive around in life sized slot cars? Remove the need for batteries - or at least have a very small one to allow entry into private property etc. It would also allow power to be supplied directly from the grid, and remove the need for toxic batteries. It would probably work considering very few people drive off road, and will autonomous cars would make a lot of sense, would also enable better navigation.

Comment Re:Reasons why I don't like Musk's hyper loop (Score 1) 124 124

1. All the diagrams give the impression that it will be like people flying through tubes as in Futurama. Instead you will be sealed inside a metallic "bullet", that runs in a metallic tube - no windows for you (sort of like James Bond in The Living Daylights). It's a pity if you have any sort of claustrophobia.

So you'd need some kind of fancy window like display that could update with local scenery or anything else.

2. While the device doesn't run in a complete vacuum, it runs in an atmosphere that is low to the point of being unbreathable. But the device doesn't contain any onboard air supply - instead it relies on the driving compressor/fan assembly to compress the air to a human sustainable amount. So if the device loses power for any reason (electrical, mechanical, computational) then you better be able to hold your breath for a long long time.

So it operates just like a modern airliner

3. There was no indication that the loop itself was anything more than a single tube. Thus there is no capability to bypass any section. So if a device fails, all devices that are already in transit and behind it are screwed (see 2 above).

It's a test environment. These things can be developed.

Comment Re:When they test these autonomous cars... (Score 1) 167 167

That's why there's still controls to drive it non autonomously.

And if that is the response, that is why autonomous cars will NEVER work on public roads.

Either the car drives itself 100% of the time, or I drive it 100% of the time.

If someone thinks that you're going to be driving along in your car not paying attention to the road, and suddenly the computer is doing to say "fuck it, I don't know, you do it" they're complete morons.

It sounds silly but that's exactly how autopilot and fly by wire systems work in Airbus and Boeing aircraft and they have hundreds of passengers at a time.

Comment Re:When they test these autonomous cars... (Score 1) 167 167

>If someone thinks that you're going to be driving along in your car not paying attention to the road, and suddenly the computer is doing to say "fuck it, I don't know, you do it" they're complete morons. It sounds silly but that's exactly how autopilot and fly by wire systems work in Airbus and Boeing aircraft and they have hundreds of passengers at a time.

Comment Re: Its a cost decision (Score 1) 840 840

It's not about cost. It's about design. They used to build things to last.

Did they really? Then why isn't our world still full of old working things that require no maintenance? I mean I can agree with the impression that things used to be built to last, but I think it might have more to do with the fact that old things were put together by hand, and were very big and electronic components were big and simple. It used to be easy to find a faulty component and fix it, but now that everything's been shrunk and stuck on a chip it's no longer simply a matter of replacing a universally available component, you have to find and buy the correct chip, which can cost more than just going down to the shop and getting a new entire product. Old things are still around and have the fame of being reliable because they are simple to fix.

Frankly, Scarlett, I don't have a fix. -- Rhett Buggler

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