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Submission + - Australian cops and anticorruption agencies keen on Hacking Team malware->

Bismillah writes: Although they've denied it in the past, Australia's federal and state police are very interested in Hacking Team's law enforcement spyware. There has also been recent interest from the Victoria state anti-corruption agency IBAC, leaked HT emails show.
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Submission + - Aussie telco caught handing over user mobile numbers to websites without consent->

AlbanX writes: Australian telco Optus has been nabbed passing over its customers's mobile phone numbers to third-party websites without their knowledge.

The practice, known as HTTP header enrichment, aims to streamline the process of direct billing for customers, but they're not happy.

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Submission + - Factory reset on millions of Android devices doesn't wipe storage->

Bismillah writes: Ross Anderson and Laurent Simon of Cambridge University studied a range of Android devices and found that even though a "factory reset" is supposed to fully wipe storage, it often doesn't. Interestingly enough, full-device encryption could be compromised by the incomplete wiping too.
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Submission + - OSGeo Foundation up in arms over ESRI LAS lock-in plans

Bismillah writes: The Open Source Geospatial Foundation is outraged over mapping giant ESRI's latest move which entails vendor lock-in for light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data through its proprietary Optimised LAS format. ESRI is the dominant company in the geospatial data arena, with its ArcGIS mapping platform boasting with over a million users and 350,000 customers.

Submission + - Australia passes mandatory data retention law->

Bismillah writes: Opposition from the Green Party and independent members of parliament wasn't enough to stop the ruling conservative Liberal-National coalition from passing Australia's new law that will force telcos and ISPs to store customer metadata for at least two years.

Journalists' metadata is not exempted from the retention law, but requires a warrant to access.

The metadata of everyone else can be accessed by unspecified government agencies without a warrant however.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - UK GCHQ spy agencies admits to using vulnerabilities to hack target systems

Bismillah writes: Lawyers for the GCHQ have told the Investigatory Powers Tribunal in the UK that the agency carries out the same illegal Computer Network Exploitation (CNE) operations that criminals and hackers do. Except they do it legally. GCHQ is currently being taken to court by Privacy International and five ISPs from UK, Germany, the Netherlands, Zimbabwe and South Korea for CNE operations that the agency will not confirm nor deny as per praxis.

Submission + - CSC subsidiary involved in Aussie bank IT bribery case->

Bismillah writes: Computer Sciences Corporation-owned enterprise cloud management provider ServiceMesh appears to have been involved in the Commonwealth Bank IT bribery scandal in Australia. CBA's former head of IT service delivery was arrested yesterday, facing two charges of accepting bribes worth A$300,000.
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