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+ - Aussie cops arrest two Anons->

Submitted by Bismillah
Bismillah (993337) writes "Australian Federal Police say they have arrested and charged one of the people behind the 2012 attack on MelbourneIT that saw 40GB of data taken by exploiting a backup server running a vulnerable version of Adobe ColdFusion.

The AFP says they also arrested an eighteen year old Penrith, New South Wales, resident for hacking."

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+ - Object seen in skydiver's helmetcam unlikely to be a meteorite 3

Submitted by The Bad Astronomer
The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes "The viral video showing what looked like a meteorite falling past a skydiver made quite a splash, with many people assuming it was true. However, further analysis shows that it's also perfectly consistent with being a small (1-3 cm) rock that fell out of the parachute itself, which is a far more likely explanation."

Comment: Re:NMCI 2.0 (Score 2) 176

Though that will only mean something to a few of us, that was the comparison I immediately made, too.

I think NMCI (and possibly this NASA system) works just fine if you're a headquarters admin/management type and all you need is email/web apps/power point. If you actually have to produce something and require more than those tools, you're going to have a bad time.

Comment: Why isn't this automatically filled in? (Score 1) 197

by BigT (#46177991) Attached to: QuakeNet: Government-Sponsored Attacks On IRC Networks

If you know commenting is so broken, why are you forcing people to use the Beta?

For the last 4 days, I've been stuck using the beta when I browse from work (IE8, not my choice) because the page is too broken to give me the option of using 'Classic mode'. I emailed the feedback link (once I found it, another thing I can't see in the beta), and got no response.

The UI and back-end stuff may be beta, but the comment system is alpha, at best, and shouldn't be forced on anybody.

+ - DARPA DRC final results, Japanese SCHAFT takes the gold->

Submitted by savuporo
savuporo (658486) writes "The two days of DARPA humanoid robotics challenge are now over. 16 teams entered in three categories — custom built humanoid, DARPA supplied Atlas platform and a non-humanoid form and competed in 8 different tasks. All Japanese SCHAFT team scored 27 out of 32 maximum points, folowed by IHMC Robotics and Tartan rescue following with 20 and 18 points. The tasks included challenges like driving a vehicle, climing ladders and walls, using handheld tools to cut through walls etc. All robots had a mix of autonomy with teleoperated controls to accomplish the tasks. Full details on scores can be found here
The 8 teams that scored highest will get continued funding from DARPA to compete in the final challenge in 2014. Two NASA teams also entered, and JPL build non-humanoid RoboSimian placed 5th, whereas JSC built and touted "Valkyire" came out of competition with zero points.
Team Shaft and Boston Dynamics building the Atlas platform were recently acquired by Google."

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+ - The FBI's Secret Interrogation Manual: Available for checkout at the Library->

Submitted by McGruber
McGruber (1417641) writes "The FBI Supervisory Special Agent who authored the FBI's interrogation manual submitted the document for copyright protection — in the process, making it available to anyone with a card for the Library of Congress to read.

The story is particularly mind-boggling for two reasons. First, the American Civil Liberties Union fought a legal battle with the FBI over access to the document. When the FBI relented and released a copy to the ACLU, it was heavily redacted — unlike the 70-plus page version of the manual available from the Library of Congress.

Second, the manual cannot even qualify for a copyright because it is a government work. Anything "prepared by an officer or employee of the United States government as part of that person's official duties" is not subject to copyright in the United States."

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+ - ask - what do you think caused the NSA to start collecting so much data?-> 13

Submitted by raymorris
raymorris (2726007) writes "Many people believe that the NSA collects far too much data, violating the privacy rights of the very citizens the NSA is supposed to protect. How did we get here? What specific structural or cultural changes can be identified that led some to believe it is okay to engage in this sort of broad dragnet surveillance as opposed to getting specific court orders for specific suspects?

Many people simply assign the blame to the opposite political party, which doesn't get very far in solving the problem and ensuring it doesn't happen again. Can we look at specific, identifiable factors and show exactly how they directly caused the intelligence community to get off track? For example, precisely which sections of which laws are being used to justify these programs, and what caused those laws to be passed? Is the surveillance directly authorized by law, or do the justifications require "creative" interpretation of the law?

In order to avoid getting into yet another fruitless political flame war and keep the discussion factually focused, please provide citations where possible."

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