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Comment: Re:why? (Score 1) 677

But perhaps you mean a goto that skips over function boarders? Not sure if you can do that in C and C++, if you can do that ofc. the stack is in your hands :) and you are at mercy of its limits.

It's called setjmp and longjmp and has been a part of the C standard since C89. However, you can still only jump UP through the stack, i.e. to a calling function, to code that has already been run.

#include <setjmp.h> /* C */
#include <csetjmp> // C++

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Setjmp.h for more information.

Comment: Re:Hypocrites, liars and communists. (Score 1) 441

by BetterThanCaesar (#48827945) Attached to: Why We Have To Kiss Off Big Carbon Now

nonsense, cattle only make up 1% of all manmade greenhouse gas emissions.

You can get quite philosophical with that statement. Are cow burps "man-made"?

On the other hand, the UN estimates that the whole livestock commodity chain contributes 18 % of all green house gas emissions, which is more than transport. This is an orange to your 1% apple, and the numbers should not be compared. It does however tell us what would happen to green house gas emissions if we stopped (or seriously cut down on) keeping livestock (primarily for meat, dairy, eggs and wool).

Also, you might want to consider that there is more cattle than humans on this planet, and most cows don't eat just grass. They are fed corn, soy, grains, and antibiotics.

Comment: Re:The World is Overcrowded (Score 1) 106

by BetterThanCaesar (#48308157) Attached to: Gates Donates $500M+ To Fight Malaria and Other Diseases

this is natures way of making sure the world doesn't get overcrowded. It's a sad fact but people NEED to die.

Then how do you explain the fact that some of the countries with the highest life expectancies, and almost no severe endemic diseases, are also the ones with the slowest-growing (or even shrinking) populations?

Because they don't spit out 5-10 kids each?

Because their 1.9 children will survive long enough to support them after retirement, and since life is not just a struggle to survive, they are productive enough that they can afford to support their parents.

Comment: Re:Too much good content is deleted at Wikipedia. (Score 4, Interesting) 239

by BetterThanCaesar (#47727187) Attached to: Latest Wikipedia Uproar Over 'Superprotection'

Notability is important for preventing a potentially slippery slope towards Wikipedia being expected to have an article on every shop, every street, every apartment complex, every popular teacher, and every creative work ever appreciated by more than 10 people.

What is wrong with that?

Sources. There are no secondary, independent sources about every shop, street, apartment complex, popular teacher, creative work, or the fact that there is a pencil lying on my desk right now. No matter how true it is, it is not verifiable in any reasonable sense of the word.

This is what people don't understand when they complain that things are deleted from Wikipedia. If Wikipedia's ambition is to create a credible encyclopaedia of all human knowledge, then it cannot be filled with speculation and half-truths. Even primary sources are suspect. I could easily create a blog or web site that claims something, then create a Wikipedia article that uses my web page as the main source. THAT is the slippery slope that is so often talked about.

Comment: Re:He claims this himself (Score 4, Interesting) 391

by BetterThanCaesar (#47653755) Attached to: Is "Scorpion" Really a Genius?

How about this then? From http://www.scorpioncomputerservices.com/whoweare.html:

<body onload="MM_preloadImages('file:///Macintosh HD/Users/brandonlavere/Desktop/PROJECTS/Paradise Film &amp; Video/Test Site/images/nav_but1_over.jpg','file:///Macintosh HD/Users/brandonlavere/Desktop/PROJECTS/Paradise Film &amp; Video/Test Site/images/nav_but2_over.jpg','file:///Macintosh HD/Users/brandonlavere/Desktop/PROJECTS/Paradise Film &amp; Video/Test Site/images/nav_but3_over.jpg','file:///Macintosh HD/Users/brandonlavere/Desktop/PROJECTS/Paradise Film &amp; Video/Test Site/images/nav_but4_over.jpg','images/nav_but5_over.jpg','file:///Macintosh HD/Users/brandonlavere/Desktop/PROJECTS/Paradise Film &amp; Video/Test Site/images/nav_but5_over.jpg','file:///Macintosh HD/Users/brandonlavere/Desktop/PROJECTS/Paradise Film &amp; Video/Test Site/images/nav_but6_over.jpg','images/0_company_over.png','images/0_difference_over.png','images/0_founder_over.png','images/0_team_over.png')">

That's production quality.

Comment: Re:less useful how? Re:The larger, the less useful (Score 2) 108

by BetterThanCaesar (#47252293) Attached to: Unicode 7.0 Released, Supporting 23 New Scripts

Unicode seems pretty backwards compatible; have any of the the newer versions overwritten or changed the meaning of older versions (e.g. caused damage)?

Yes. Version 2.0 completely changed the Hangul character set. Korean texts written with Unicode 1.1 were not readable in Unicode 2.0, and vice versa. This was 17 years ago, but note that it was after ISO had accepted version 1.1 as an ISO/IEC standard.

Comment: Re:C strikes again! (Score 1) 152

Actually, C does not try to handle pointers at all. It treats them just like a long int (with the appropriate cast) [...].

That's not actually true. First of all, there is no direct connection between the size of pointers and the size of long int. That is platform and implementation dependent. Secondly, at compile-time, pointer arithmetic differs a lot from that of integers. You cannot add two pointers. You can subtract two pointers to the same type (except void); that will give you the number of elements between them, in the ptrdiff_t type. (In theory, that's only possible if the pointers point to the same array, but the compiler can't know if that's true in the general case.) You can add an integer to a non-void pointer. Adding N to a pointer p is the same as &p[N], i.e. you get a pointer to the Nth element.

Comment: Re:Modern audiophiles are no different. (Score 1) 469

Excuse my ignorance, but wouldn't a 20kHz sine wave sound less harsh or loud compared to a 20kHz square wave?

It would not. The "harshness" is the overtones (40 kHz, 60 kHz, etc.), which you cannot hear. From a mechanical point of view, no matter how quickly the signal switches from low to high, the hairs in your cochlea are bound by their individual resonant frequencies, which limit their respective frequency ranges.

"Right now I feel that I've got my feet on the ground as far as my head is concerned." -- Baseball pitcher Bo Belinsky

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