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Comment Re:Lewis' Law (Score 1) 618

"Lewis' Law" is what is called a Kafkatrap. If you claim that negative responses to your idea validate it, then you have rendered it non-falsifiable; you have essentially quit the field of argument telling yourself you have won - when nothing could be further from the truth.

It's not a claim that all negative responses to any idea validate it. It's a claim that in the (negative) responses to pro-feminism articles lies evidence of the problem that feminism tries to solve. Write something positive about feminism, or negative about misogyny, and you will be told to get back to the stove, or even threatened with rape and murder – or, if you are a man, that you are a woman, or gay.

Comment Re:Math is fun (Score 1) 132

Even if you don't subscribe to the historical meaning of "decimate", namely "reduce by one tenth (through killing)", that sentence still doesn't make sense because "decimate" never means simply "kill".

This reminds me of the Anchorman quote "60 percent of the time, it works every time."

Comment Re:Is it addressed to her? (Score 1) 213

now my name is unusual so I doubt someone picked my email at random.

Because if I take a long list of names and pick one at random the name I pick will be a common one?

Good point. If we make a list of all possible names and randomly pick an index, uncommon names will be picked more often than common names.

But just like pink noise is random, even though (unlike white noise) it's biased towards previous values, picking names off the top of one's head is random (i.e. non-determinative), but heavily biased towards common names (in one's culture/experience). In fact, from a signal processing point of view, it can be seen as a non-ergodic process, since one person's random sequence of names will differ from another person's.

Comment Re:The Perfect Bait (Score 2) 1097

A protest isn't the same as murder.

Itzly wrote: "I can't recall many protests or people getting killed for it". Your reply implies that that I shouldn't have reacted to the word "protests", only to the much stronger "killed". Yet, the fact that Itzly wrote it implies that I should have read it and registered the impression that even protests are almost unheard of. This is a way of sneaking poor arguments into a discussion by attaching a much harder-to-dispute statement to it.

Comment Re:The Perfect Bait (Score 1) 1097

Oh, it happens. Protests, at least.

A 2,000-strong battalion of police in riot gear cordoned off streets around the cultural center to prevent an outbreak of violence as thousands took to the streets to blast the portrayal of Jesus and his disciples as gay.

Comment Re:Times (Score 1) 154

Ten times fainter? "One tenth as bright" reads better and makes more sense.

In electrical engineering, there is something called admittance, which is the inverse of impedance. Are there similar inverse terms for radiometry? If so, then "ten times fainter" makes sense, because it would be using a "faintness" scale that is established.

Comment Re:What are they trying to show? (Score 1) 522

I'll bite; why is a love interest not an actual character?

It's not an actual character if it's the ONLY character that women get to play.

If you apply both the Bechdel test and the "gender reversed Bechdel test" to movies, you will see that this is more than a curiosity. The results are overwhelming. If you're a male actor, you get to play someone who has conversations with other male characters about lots of topics. If you're a female actor, you get to play the love interest, whose only conversations with other women is about men. The result is that women are portrayed as being only there for (the pleasure of) men.

The results will vary depending on which films you count. Independent films are perhaps (but not necessarily) better than mainstream blockbusters, but far fewer people see them, so they have a much lower impact anyway.

Comment Re:why? (Score 1) 677

But perhaps you mean a goto that skips over function boarders? Not sure if you can do that in C and C++, if you can do that ofc. the stack is in your hands :) and you are at mercy of its limits.

It's called setjmp and longjmp and has been a part of the C standard since C89. However, you can still only jump UP through the stack, i.e. to a calling function, to code that has already been run.

#include <setjmp.h> /* C */
#include <csetjmp> // C++

See for more information.

Comment Re:Hypocrites, liars and communists. (Score 1) 441

nonsense, cattle only make up 1% of all manmade greenhouse gas emissions.

You can get quite philosophical with that statement. Are cow burps "man-made"?

On the other hand, the UN estimates that the whole livestock commodity chain contributes 18 % of all green house gas emissions, which is more than transport. This is an orange to your 1% apple, and the numbers should not be compared. It does however tell us what would happen to green house gas emissions if we stopped (or seriously cut down on) keeping livestock (primarily for meat, dairy, eggs and wool).

Also, you might want to consider that there is more cattle than humans on this planet, and most cows don't eat just grass. They are fed corn, soy, grains, and antibiotics.

Adapt. Enjoy. Survive.