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Comment Re:There Is A Single Answer (Score 1) 222

CaptainLard is correct. Brake rotors do not warp. When they get hot, they "cone" and when the cool off they return to their normal shape.

Any and all run-out is due to uneven pad material transfer. Uneven pad material transfer is due to overheating the rotor which crystallizes the cast iron and promotes continued and early overheating after the fact. Even if you resurface the rotor to remove all pad buildup, you're going to get uneven pad transfer soon again at lower temps because the rotor has localized hot spots built in now.

The pad material is very often metallic (not ceramic) on performance setups as shown in that YouTube video. The material is molecularly bonded to the iron rotor. This makes it indistinguishable on the surface of the metallic rotor.

Comment Re:Why doesn't anyone make a completely sealed pho (Score 1) 136

I modded your comment down, but realized it was only because I disagreed with your statement, and I should be voicing my disagreement with a comment instead.

A sealed phone as you describe means a battery that is not user serviceable. I am strongly in the "a device's battery should be user serviceable" camp.

Submission + - How a young child fought off the AIDS virus (

sciencehabit writes: In 1996, a baby infected with HIV at birth was started on anti-AIDS drugs. But at age 6, against the advice of doctors, her family stopped treatment. Twelve years later, the young French woman is still healthy, with no detectable virus in her blood. Her unusual case, reported today at an international AIDS conference in Vancouver, Canada, may hold clues that might help other HIV-infected people control their infections without antiretroviral drugs and offer insights to AIDS vaccine developers.

Comment Stopped at a GREEN traffic light. (Score 3, Insightful) 549

Where was this? I want to move there.
The driver two cars ahead of the autonomus car was stopped at a green light (according tot he video), properly avoiding entering the intersection until they could drive through it (there is a car stopped immediately at the end of the intersection according to the video).
That is some good driving on everyone's part, except the driver of the Lexus who rear-ended the autonomous car of course.

Comment Re:Sad (Score 1) 452

I wish this aditude weren't so prevelant. You can run a user-centric service and still make money.

Instead of seeking vendor or ad revenue, just allow your users to support the site. Give them the opportunity to be a "site supporter" and throw them a bone. A different colored username can be enough, or maybe toss in one or two more "nicities" (not defacto requirements) like a larger inbox, or some other such thing.

This is how I run the forum I'm an administor of. We accept ad revenue and vendor revenue, but the main source of revenue is from the users and that will always be true. Paid vendors have been run off by the users for being bad players, and we like it that way.
Block the ads, we don't care.

I can only imagine the revenue Reddit could garner if they'd just give their users the chance to support the site for pennies a day.

Comment Why was the Volt not a pure series hybrid? (Score 2) 229

Pam Fletcher, as an automotive enthusiast (who is looking forward to our future of electric cars) in order to keep my brain from filling up completely, I don't keep track of all of the intricate differences between hybrid cars.
After learning the intricacies of each system, I tend to lump them into three categories for my convenience (plug-in capability being a sub-category itself).

Weak parallel hybrids; those with very minimal battery storage and no all-electric mode like the 1st gen Ford Escape.
Strong parallel hybrids; those with large battery capacity, all-electric mode, but the internal combustion engine still drives the wheels often like the Toyota Prius, Honda Insight, etc.
Series hybrids; AC Propulsion T-Zero with trailer generator (or any all-electric with a generator on a trailer for that matter), Chevy Volt, etc.

So I've lumped the Chevy Volt in the series hybrid group, although technically it can provide some power to the wheels mechanically via the internal combustion engine. With the Volt being so close to a pure series hybrid, I'd like to know why the leap to a pure series hybrid wasn't made completely? There must be one or a few solid reasons. Was it a serendipitous capability due to the packaging? What is necessary to satisfy focus group complaints? Was it to ensure a completely dead battery or charging system wouldn't side-line the vehicle? What was the thinking there?


Comment Re:Wireless charging hit mainstream ~ 1-2 years ag (Score 1) 184

Simple inductive charging (which looks like what you're talking about when you say "wireless" in your comment) is mainstream.

Wireless charging has been around for electric tooth brushes for at least 5 years now, maybe 10. It's been so long I won't even bother to give names.
Wireless charging for cosmetic electronics like the the Claresonic face brush has been around for at least 5 years.
Wireless charging for sex toys has been around for 3-5 years, for an example see the Wee-Vibe.
Wireless charging for electric cars has been around for 2-3 years as well. I believe Tesla does it, and the Nissan Leaf got it in 2013, among others.

It sounds to me like you're not buying the right category of devices.

Comment Good. (Score 4, Insightful) 196

Weren't we up in arms about the artificial wage stagnation due to silicon valley employers agreeing not to "poach" (AKA participate in capitalism) each other's employees?
If A123 wants to keep their employees, they might have to *gasp* offer them better conditions/compensation? The horror.

We're here to give you a computer, not a religion. - attributed to Bob Pariseau, at the introduction of the Amiga