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Comment Re:Desktops vs Mobile (Score 1) 250 250

At no point did I say iOS was "clean and easy." I said it's possible with C#. Having said that, I use Xamarin a lot and their AOT compilation technique - while a little unwieldy if you're not on a Mac - works surprisingly well.

If Xamarin can do what they've done with C#/.NET then obviously it's POSSIBLE to do this in Java, but I haven't seen any actual implementation. This is why I said "right now." Or maybe I've missed the Java project that allows you to share 90% of your code between iOS, Android, and Windows.

If by "back end" you mean server side infrastructure you are correct, but only because Xamarin doesn't have to pay much attention to the back end. .NET has an entire stack devoted to such matters and Microsoft foots the bill on maintaining it. Xamarin just focuses on the "last mile" if you will.

Comment Re:Desktops vs Mobile (Score 1) 250 250

"99.5% of the code I encounter doesn't use above Java 1.4 or .Net 2.0, so all the nifty language features are pretty much theoretical sizzle on roughly the same steak. And even so, the nifty features often have negative value because they while save the programmer 2-3% of his or her time, the maintainers often end up breaking things because they're not all that familiar with the new hotness in language features."

Obviously I can't tell you what you've seen but, in comparison, I see LINQ (.NET 3.0 I think) everywhere. Async/await is pretty popular too but it is newer and isn't as universally usable so it is not as common as LINQ.

Comment Re:Desktops vs Mobile (Score 3, Interesting) 250 250

It depends on your situation but, right now, C# is the only language that you can use to write programs for Windows Desktop (including Win32/.NET/Modern), Web, Mac Desktop, Android, and iOS.

And with all of the OWIN stuff you'll be able to run pristine .NET apps on OS X and Linux.

And you'll be able to host all of this code in one source-controlled Visual Studio project.

It may not be a reason to switch a shop entirely, but there is definitely a unique value-proposition.

Comment Re:Uber's in a completely different market (Score 1) 183 183

So I live in Downtown Atlanta Ga which is far from suburban. There are plenty of taxi stands around but I prefer to use Uber. Why? Because almost invariably the taxis do not operate "within the law as the state, the counties, and the cities require."

When I walk up to a cab they ask me where I'm going, and if I'm not going very far they almost always refuse to give me a ride. Many also don't turn on their fare meters and make up rates (I've lived Downtown for 16 years, I know what a ride is supposed to cost). My understanding is that both of these actions are in violation of the ordinances that govern the operation of Taxis in the city.

Could I report these people or challenge their bogus practices? Sure. But instead I just take Uber where these issues don't exist and I ALWAYS get excellent customer service - whether in a Town Car or a Hyundai.

The situation in other cities might be different, but here, the cab drivers have dug their own graves.

Comment Re:A bigger risk (Score 1) 641 641

A greater intelligence may prefer internally inconsistent rules and use complex heuristics to choose between them. To us, the results of that process may seem so unfathomably complex that it looks random.

I enjoyed this story which is related: http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/~billh/g/mcnrsts.html

Comment Re:Denning Mobile Robotics (Score 1) 139 139

The robots might be cheaper today. Especially if it is just a webcam, microphone, motorized wheels, battery and the cheapest wireless networking computer being operated by a server in a more secure area of the store.

I imagine a single guard monitoring feeds from ten of these roaming around a wal-mart. The guard doesn't even have to be in the wal-mart. Throw a blanket over it and the guard knows something is wrong and calls physical security.

Throw in some advanced mapping that can compare expected camera images to actual images and use the human to examine positive signals and dismiss the false positives. You might be able to up that human monitor to monitor 100 to 1000 units depending on the false positive rate and the rate of actual incidents.

99% of the time, nothing is happening during security guard duty.

How much net work could a network work, if a network could net work?

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