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Comment Re:Copyright (Score 1) 134 134

Am I the only one who would be more than ok with this happening? I'd be fascinated. If I could see how that person grows up I could get so many answers to interesting questions. For example common things that are partly or completely attributed to genetics such as IQ, body weight, height etc. But also what kind of interests would that person develop, what kind of tastes, would there be any similarities in terms of personality. What could be wrong with a several decades younger clone living somewhere else if the clone is healthy. More than one clone could be problematic for the clones but not really for me. It doesn't take a clone to plant my DNA at a crime scene. Besides DNA can hardly be the only evidence in such case. And if the opposite happens, the clone turns out more successful than me then I guess I'll be a little jealous but probably too old to care.

Comment Re:Why (Score 1) 642 642

Perhaps you're not thinking of all the possibilities. For example it might be possible to transfer one's consciousness as information which would also mean that this could be done between solar systems making light-speed travel kind-of possible. Lets assume that information could be transferred faster than light. This could make inter-stellar travel an everyday thing even. Assuming of course that the receiver end has been transported there the old-fashioned way.
Windows

Submission + - EU Vista, XP Users Will Also Get To Vote IE Off

An anonymous reader writes: 'Upon closer inspection, Microsoft's browser ballot proposal for the EU is much more drastic than one would expect. Users will choose from up to 10 different browsers. And it won't be limited to Windows 7 users; the ballot screen will be pushed as an update to current Windows XP and Windows Vista users. PC manufacturers will also have the option of shipping one or more third-party browsers in place of IE8 without fear of retaliation from Microsoft. It's a big change for a company that just last month wanted Windows 7 to be shipped in Europe without Internet Explorer 8 so as to avoid a ballot screen in the first place. The balloting process will last for five years from the date the European Commission agrees to it, which pushes it into Windows 8 territory. Ars takes a closer look at the nitty gritty of the browser ballot announced late last week.'

Comment short answer: no (Score 3, Informative) 180 180

The transaction looks like this: 1) user chooses which kind of credit card he/she has 2) user gets a screen where he/she can specify the cc nr and de-scramble the code 3) user's browser sends the cc nr and de-scrambled code back to the server 4) server replies: all is well, congratulations If the fraudster is able to intercept just 1 of these transactions then he can already narrow the number of possible "PassWindow" combinations down to lets say a few hundred. But if he can intercept for example 3 or more of the transactions made with the same card then he can easily narrow the possibilities down to fewer than ten combinations. There exists no mechanism that would prevent the fraudster from trying out all of these 10 or fewer combinations. The most secure way to handle cc transactions would be to confirm every transaction with the cc holder. It could work with e-mail, sms, telephone, im or any other means of communication that the cc holder has chosen and believes is secure enough for him/her. That of course would create significant delays that many current cc systems would be unable to handle since atm they expect instant replies from the cc issuer. Which means that this system would only work with credit cards meant for online payments. In physical stores the 'pin code' is still the best solution at least until the confirmation delays come down to a few seconds.

Comment yawn! (Score 2, Insightful) 77 77

So it has 5 1D accelerometers under each finger connected to a primitive microcontroller and an usb controller? Basically no useful software? For $500 that's probably going to be $800+ when and if it ever reaches Europe? Forgive me but this is hardly exciting. Come beck when you have 32 sensors which I believe is the minimum you'll need if you want to be able to record every movement of a human hand. Then you'll be worth your 3 line slashvertisement.

Comment Re:Isn't this simple? (Score 1) 154 154

Well right now they're advertising the 'maximum' time without explicitly saying that this is the maximum you might get out of your battery if you turn your speakers off, brightness low and don't move the mouse at all, better yet don't even log into the os. The 'minimum' could be a much more usable term. 'h of full screen video' could in theory be even better but we're never going to get there.

Comment Re:hmm. (Score 1) 224 224

2) It's easy. All we need to do is either invent tractor beam or send a huge automated squirt gun to the orbit that will shoot the debris off the orbit with water :D It might also be possible to disintegrate the debris with an anti-missile laser. Besides what could be 'cooler' than hypersonic, glowing, molten blobs of titanium.

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