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Comment: German teaching methods (Score 1) 431

by AndyCater (#46741801) Attached to: Is Germany Raising a Generation of Illiterates?

Most Germans speak and write better English than I do - and I'm posting this from the UK. For German, at least, it probably doesn't help to have had several attempts at reforming German orthography within the last 30 years.In the same period, I _think_ Dutch has had one major spelling reform.

+1 to the person suggesting formal German hochdeutsch: also, for the historically inclined, it may now be safe to start teaching how to read fraktur / black letter type again or the German speaking nations will miss out entirely on the original books and literature pre 1930 or so.

Comment: Re:backpedaling (Score 1) 61

by AndyCater (#43976761) Attached to: Oracle Reinstates Free Time Zone Updates For Java 7

I don't have a business support contract with Oracle - I don't actually have any obviously Oracle products here at the moment.

If I _DID_ have a business support contract with Oracle for any product, I think thiis would persuade me that my money was wasted: this sort of little thing drags down a big business reputation. Oracle may have fantastic databases, middleware, people management software, hardware, Linux OS, Java - in rough order of importance to Oracle - but this shows that they can't be trusted to do well with small things.I'd trust their lawyers to draft a good contract, favourable to them but I can't trust them to know their own products, own codebase or even what they have to do with them.

Run, don't walk away from Oracle products as fast as you practicably can or find someone else to support them for you at added cost to you since you can't rely on Oracle and produce a backout plan to move your business away from Oracle dependence immediately.

Comment: Working and travelling (Score 1) 273

If you've been a student - get recommendations from your supervisors. Carry some academic credentials so that you can get to universities / higher education institutes / academic libraries. If you can afford it, take a course in a European universtiy for a semester or two. Connectivity may well be the biggest / most expensive problem.

Hammer out visas ahead of time - make contingency arrangements to transfer money - one of the hardest things will probably be moving living expenses around.

Find software developers to hang around with in the areas you're moving to next. contribute to FLOSS in an international team before you go?

Be prepared to learn (human) languages as needed, even if only enough to order food from a street stall / cafe or whatever. Be prepared to live like a local and life is always easier.

Comment: Re:Some ideas (Score 1) 527

by AndyCater (#33255982) Attached to: Preserving Memories of a Loved One?
All this is good. Shortbread and cakes made with your daughters, family meals enjoyed if you can. Family recipes which bring back laughter and times shared. My Dad still has a lump in his throat when he talks about his mother's shortbread / berates her for always leaving him to do the cooking :) I remember my grandmother just before she died hiding sweets for me in her bedclothes and telling me stories. Hugs and smells and memories of perfume. Being told what the flowers are in her favourite garden / making mud pies - whatever it takes to have physical experiences too.
Linux Business

+ - Linux installfests maturing?->

Submitted by
christian.einfeldt
christian.einfeldt writes "Linux installfests apparently are expanding from an emphasis on serving individual users to mass network installs serving non-profits and schools. In the past, installfests have often been held as part of Linux User Group meetings, and involved individual new computer users bringing their computers to a small meeting to have Linux installed on their machines. But now there is an apparent trend visible in Linux installfests toward mass network installs supported by greater corporate or municipal involvement in Linux installfests. In many cases, the newly-installed Linux computers are being given to end user institutions such as schools. For example, a recent installfest in Austin, Texas, was put on by two non-profits and was supported by the personal participation of upper management at AMD and nFusion. The majority of the eighty-three machines were PXE-booted and mass-installed at that event over an ad hoc network. Likewise, at last year's LinuxWorld expo in San Francisco, 350 Linux computers were mass-installed over a similar PXE network in a mass installfest put on in a partnership between the non-profit Alameda County Computer Resource Center and the for-profit Untangle and IDG firms. The machines were donated to San Francisco Bay Area schools. Similar installfests have been held in Chile and India, to name just a few."
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