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Comment Re:Can't stop it (Score 1) 428 428

the supervisor was shown the door rather quickly, that tech had friends in high places.

Very effective.... use a sacrificial supervisor/lower-level-employee to break the law and fire folks over Section 7 rights exercise / unionization attempts.. Supervisor fired, and plausible deniability regained.

In theory they could still be sued, but it's probably exceedingly unlikely.

That's why... if you want to do a unionization effort, then you better make sure it succeeds, and ideally involve observers outside the company with legal assistance.

Initially... some verbal discussions of pay information in safe place off work premises is probably harder for management to combat.

Ideally, there would be legal papers written up, letters already crafted, and backup plans established to address retaliation attempts, before management becomes aware... if an organizer gets canned, then management should be served with legal papers the same day.

Comment Re:Won't allow forwarding? (Score 1) 195 195

No.... it's a 3rd party messaging service using HTML E-mail and a custom browser extension. To enforce the "self-destruct" rule, the e-mail is hosted on the Dmail provider's mail servers instead of the content being sent in the e-mail message.

Nothing to see here..... I'm not going to be accepting any e-mail sent using such a service. I will tell the sender "No, send me a normal e-mail message; I can't read that one."

Comment Re:Can't stop it (Score 1) 428 428

if google fired a significant number of those people, they'd have an unwinnable class action suit on their hands

There will be enough plausible deniability to go around when they batch those dismissals with their next mass layoff that includes people not on the list as well.

And they don't have to fire them all at once..... just make sure that over time the people putting themselves on the list don't do well on the company, and those that are promoted are always the people that maintain the expected confidentiality.

They can start an informal informal internal investigation to figure out who was responsible for setting this whole thing up.

Then have a discussion with their respective managers and make sure their next performance review will reflect abysmal performance.

And promote the people not on that list offer benefits and bonuses conjoined with a confidentiality requirement on those bonus deals....

Comment Re:Can't stop it (Score 1) 428 428

Pattern is the evidence of discrimination

No... Pattern warrants investigation.

I'm just going to say that the case says nothing about this issue; discrimination is a totally different bit of legal code, it's also a taboo in society with different status in the courtroom. Find a case where an employee was laid off or fired, and the employer was fined a big sum, since it was found to be retaliation for divulging salary, even though the employer said they had a very different reason.

they don't put that they fired them because they were pregnant.

The employee had a conversation with their boss where they were urged to quit or told their performance would be bad because they were pregnant.

They didn't have a credible reason for the firing, And their management created witnesses to a scheme for creating a bogus reason to fire.

A manager creating a scheme to frame someone for a firing offense seems pretty convincing that there is not a legal reason for the firing, otherwise they would not feel a need to do something in order to falsify a reason, since a manager can just fire them.

Comment Re:Can't stop it (Score 1) 428 428

$185 million in damages to a former employee

For overt acts involving sex-based discrimination and discrimination based on pregnancy.

They could have avoided paying out damages if they weren't actively discriminating based on sex And their firing reason was based on performance reviews showing a failure by the employee to do their job w.o./ insinuation that pregnancy was a reason for the firing.

Comment Re:Can't stop it (Score 4, Interesting) 428 428

Yup. Same law that says you can unionize says they can't stop you from sharing pay and benefits information.

The law says they cannot; However, most employers feel the law is unfair to the employer and may very well intentionally disobey the law in a subtle manner.

If they find you shared your salary, then your company might find another reason to fire you and terminate you for that other reason. In an at-will state it's easier..... "According to the latest performance review, you're just not a good fit for our company, so we have to let you go."

Google could technically do the same for everyone on that spreadsheet. Sharing their own salary info would not be mentioned on the official papers as reason for termination, But their accessing/showing the spreadsheet could be grounds for termination upon suspicion of gaining unauthorized access to HR systems.

Companies need to make the money, and employment costs going up would be a huge negative for the shareholders and managers' bonuses.

Comment Re:Drama is coming. (Score 2) 90 90

I predict that men will whine that they can't see videos set so that only women can see them.

Owing to this new change to Facebook.... I have decided to change the Gender in my profile from "Male" to "Both" or from "Male" to "It's complicated"

Next, in case they block me from seeing any videos based on that anyways..... I intend to file a lawsuit against Facebook for discrimination against LGBT people.

Comment DEC for DTP (Score 1) 614 614

Well, I wasn't the one using it, but in late 1998, I was working at a printer -- a big industrial one, with huge lithographic presses. The prepress department there was transitioning to using Macintosh G3s for DTP work, and I was there to help with that. The reason for the transition was that their old DTP needs had been served by some sort of DEC minicomputer.

It was about the size of a fridge, with dual 8" floppy drives, so I'm hoping it was a MicroVAX, but I don't recall. Each workstation wired into it had a VTerm, as well as a Barco graphics monitor and a mouse. You'd type in commands to their DTP software on the VTerm, then view the work as a line drawing on the Barco (all it was capable of -- photos had to be pasted in by hand) and adjust it with the mouse.

They'd been using the thing since the early 80s, but apparently it was breaking down and they were having trouble pulling people out of retirement to fix it, and that, plus the new digital press they were building, forced the transition to Macs.

The company got bought some years later, but is still in operation, so I guess things more or less worked out.

Comment Re:Am I the only guy here that likes G+? (Score 1) 152 152

Or, as I put it, the people who aren't on Google+ are the reason I am on Google+

Yep... and with that in mind; I'm going to go back and login to my Orkut account and partake in the conversation.

Wait...

What the?

Oh Shit..... when the hell did Google hijack their web page and turn off the social community features?

Comment Re:Am I the only guy here that likes G+? (Score 1) 152 152

Best of all, its now REQUIRED to post comments on youtube. Fuck that.

What do you mean? I still post comments on Youtube using my original pre-Google Youtube ID that Google forced me to link to a Google account or turn into a Google account, but I still keep separate from my G+ / Youtube real-name ID which I avoid using (Sometimes with pain, because they sometimes like to randomly switch my Youtube window back to another ID, or open an annoying prompt to ask me which Identity I would like to use).

Comment Re:More by whom (Score 1) 368 368

Don't worry.... as soon as it becomes legal, there are manufacturers that are going to make specialized drone-killing weapons that pose little/no danger to humans themselves, As long as the drone crashing doesn't itself pose a danger.

The first thing that comes to mind is a HERF gun.

Comment Re: Why are we even discussing this again? (Score 1) 213 213

without 4 yr degrees who were better engineers that some of the code monkeys coming out of school.

The point of requiring creds is not to give a fine-grained measure of quality, but to provide a way of filtering out Bob from Marketing/Website Design who this morning decides he wants to be hired for a C++ solution architect role with no experience, so he can see what it's like....

If they don't have an engineering education, than they are not engineers. Just really really good code monkeys who happened to meet whatever need you had at the time.

You have to vet the school, and require a transcript, check GPA and require at least 1 educational reference. Not all 4 year programs are created equal, and not everyone who completed a 4yr program performed equally well.

Just like not all CCNPs have equal knowledge; the credential is just confirming a baseline.

Get hold of portable property. -- Charles Dickens, "Great Expectations"

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