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Comment: In Google's World (Score 2, Insightful) 617

by ALimoges (#33791266) Attached to: Take This GUI and Shove It
If you were to read a how-to on a blog about configuring a router using a GUI, it would take a few pages. If it were about configuring a router using a CLI, it would fit in one page. Bottom line: in today's world where a forgotten command can be remembered quickly using our friend Google, I much prefer CLI because it makes me read less, and do more.

Comment: Prison...really? (Score 2, Insightful) 211

by ALimoges (#22505320) Attached to: Largest Hacking Scam in Canadian History
It's funny because now it's all over the news here in Québec, and pseudo-experts are trying to explain *how* to secure one's computer. Don't you guys understand that Windows *is* insecure!

The people who got hacked are facing a maximum of 10 years in prison but with Québec's system, they really do 1/6 of this time so it's not that bad..
The Courts

HP & Dell Face Lawsuits From Exploding Hardware 135

Posted by Zonk
from the not-something-you-want-to-wake-up-to dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Dell and Hewlett-Packard are both facing lawsuits over catastrophic equipment failures that lead to fires and injuries last year. 'In one case, a North Dakota auto lube shop owner claims that a Dell monitor he purchased caught fire and burned down his business ... meanwhile, an Arkansas man has sued HP, claiming that an HP Compaq Presario PC he purchased from Wal-Mart burst into flames, causing a blaze that destroyed his house and seriously injured his daughter.'"
Privacy

FBI Wiretaps Canceled for Non-Payment 166

Posted by timothy
from the in-united-states-bills-collect-you dept.
grassy_knoll writes "Apparently, the FBI hasn't been paying the telcos for the wiretaps they've initiated, so the telcos have canceled the wiretaps. From the AP article linked: 'Telephone companies have cut off FBI wiretaps used to eavesdrop on suspected criminals because of the bureau's repeated failures to pay phone bills on time. A Justice Department audit released Thursday blamed the lost connections on the FBI's lax oversight of money used in undercover investigations. Poor supervision of the program also allowed one agent to steal $25,000, the audit said. In at least one case, a wiretap used in a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act investigation "was halted due to untimely payment," the audit found.'"
The Internet

Wikipedia Wins Defamation Case 153

Posted by Zonk
from the wiki-this dept.
Raul654 writes "Yesterday, a French judge dismissed a lawsuit against the Wikimedia Foundation for defamation. The judge found that 'Web site hosts cannot be liable under civil law because of information stored on them if they do not in fact know of their illicit nature.' According to the inquirer: 'Three plaintiffs were each seeking 69,000 euros ($100,000) in damages for invasion of their privacy after their homosexuality was revealed on the website.'"
The Courts

U.of Oregon Says No to RIAA 241

Posted by Zonk
from the always-a-good-feeling-right dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "The University of Oregon has filed a motion to quash the RIAA's subpoena for information on student identities in what is believed to be the first such motion made by a university with support from the state Attorney General. The motion (pdf) explains that it is impossible to identify the alleged infringers from the information the RIAA has presented: 'Five of the seventeen John Does accessed the content in question from double occupancy dorm rooms at the University. With regard to these Does, the University is able to identify only the room where the content was accessed and whether or not the computer used was a Macintosh or a PC ... The University cannot determine whether the content in question accessed by one occupant as opposed to another, or whether it was accessed instead by a visitor.' The AG's motion further argues (pdf) that "Plaintiffs' subpoena is unduly burdensome and overbroad. It seeks information that the University does not readily possess. In order to attempt to comply with the subpoena, the University would be forced to undertake an investigation to create discovery for Plaintiffs — an obligation not imposed by Rule 45. As the University is unable to identify the alleged infringers with any accuracy, it cannot comply with its federal obligation to notify students potentially affected by the subpoena. One commentator has likened the AG's argument to saying, in effect, that the RIAA's evidence is 'rubbish'."

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