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Comment Re:I can tell you what will happen ... (Score 3, Interesting) 265

This. Oregon DOT did a study a few years ago and concluded that in western Oregon (where essentially all the population is), 70 [seventy] road bridges will go down.

For household prep, top priority is water, which may be the hardest thing. At least one 5 gallon jug per person. We have 10 gallons per person, which is pathetically inadequate. Food for 2 weeks. Camp stove with fuel. Flashlights, radios, batteries. Firewood. Extra prescription meds. Gasoline (I keep a 5 gallon jug and I never let my car get below 1/4 tank).

I haven't read the article yet (awaiting my magazine to arrive) but the scariest part is that if a strong earthquake hits the CSZ off Oregon in the spring/summer when the reservoirs are full, the Hills Creek Dam (an earthen dam) could fail. This could then cause Dexter Dam below it fail. Then most of the cities of Springfield and Eugene (about 200,000 people) would be scraped off the face of the Earth.

Comment E-prescribing is no panacea (Score 1) 134

A recent study found that 1/12 or 1/8 (can't remember which, so call it 1/10) of electronic prescriptions had an error. Types of errors include: wrong medication, wrong dose, wrong instructions, wrong quantity. I do dozens of electronic orders a day and get several kicked back to me from the pharmacist.

Comment Re:The originals really are something else (Score 1) 140

In college in the early 1980s I did some work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. I spent several days wiring up the logic circuits (CAMAC modules) for our detectors. Our data cables were labeled with their lengths in nanoseconds. A 1 nanosecond cable would be about a foot long.

Comment rx abx if it's friday (Score 3, Interesting) 595

I'm a primary care physician in the US. There are a number of logistical issues in the decision whether to prescribe antibiotics. They revolve around the ease of followup. It would be nice to always be able to say "You'll probably be fine. If you get sicker, come back." But if it's a Thursday or Friday, or if the patient lives an hour's drive from the clinic, or if I'm about to go on vacation, or if my schedule is overbooked for the next few days, I'm much more likely to prescribe an antibiotic. We need better access to care. Among the things that would help that would be (1) single payer insurance, so people could get care anywhere, and (2) better compensation for primary care providers (PCPs) which would result in (a) more of them, relative to specialists and (b) less need for existing PCP to overbook their schedules to make ends meet.

Do not underestimate the value of print statements for debugging.