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Comment: Re:My FreeBSD Report: Four Months In (Score 3, Informative) 471

by 0100010001010011 (#48969987) Attached to: Systemd Getting UEFI Boot Loader

It WAS that way:

A Linux-based system is a modular Unix-like operating system. It derives much of its basic design from principles established in Unix during the 1970s and 1980s. Such a system uses a monolithic kernel, the Linux kernel, which handles process control, networking, and peripheral and file system access. Device drivers are either integrated directly with the kernel or added as modules loaded while the system is running.

Other people in this thread have already point out that the direction systemd is headed will leave us with 2 binaries: The kernel and systemd. What next, systemd incorporates a mysql server?

Comment: Re:My FreeBSD Report: Four Months In (Score 5, Interesting) 471

by 0100010001010011 (#48969865) Attached to: Systemd Getting UEFI Boot Loader

Have you tried it on a stable OS release that has systemd?

You mean like Fedora/RH which has 4 'urgent' severity bugs with systemd

Including one where systemd breaks Keyboard shortcuts handling in text virtual consoles on Redhat Enterprise Linux.

If you lower the bar to "high" priority you get some fun ones like:

Unable to boot when systemd's LogTarget is set to syslog-or-kmsg or syslog on RHEL7. (The devs left it at "Ok, dropping log messages even just from systemd itself isn't probaly a best way, but wee need more time for investigation." in September 2014).

reboot or shutdown commands unresponsive during systemd-fsck

systemd stuck when auto-mouting volume for NFS

Systemd doesn't unmount all devices before calling reboot/halt and thus corrupts a clean RAID1

These aren't "oops, I can't play MP3" level bugs.

Comment: Re:My FreeBSD Report: Four Months In (Score 0) 471

by 0100010001010011 (#48969715) Attached to: Systemd Getting UEFI Boot Loader

To quote Debian:

How Debian Testing Works

Packages from Debian Unstable enter the next-stable testing distribution automatically, when a list of requirements is fulfilled:

  • The package has been in "unstable" at least for 2-10 days (depending on the urgency of the upload).
  • The package has been built for all the architectures which the present version in testing was built for.
  • Installing the package into testing will not make the distribution more uninstallable.
  • The package does not introduce new release critical bugs.

There are definitely some systemd bugs that would be considered 'critical release' bugs, including a new one on Fedora that randomly makes folders RO such that daemons and services can't start.

I would call that a 'critical release bug'.

Comment: Re:My FreeBSD Report: Four Months In (Score 2) 471

by 0100010001010011 (#48969685) Attached to: Systemd Getting UEFI Boot Loader

Wow, I had to go look for myself and you're right RedHat/Fedora has ironed out ALL the bugs with systemd

This one is a few weeks old

most, if not all of my systemd-units on a dozen of servers using constructs like below to make the whole tree /var/lib readonly and the needed subfolder RW which is now broken in Fedora 21 and kills all my setups

And what makes debugging even more fun is it does it randomly too:

I can confirm Harald's report at DigitalOcean F21 x86_64. It happens on root login, but *not* every time.

Comment: Re:My FreeBSD Report: Four Months In (Score 0) 471

by 0100010001010011 (#48968965) Attached to: Systemd Getting UEFI Boot Loader

There's a difference between This package broke a small test case" and "A large number of users are having problems across the board"

If Debian developers were following their own rules systemd would have never made it out of unstable or experimental. It was certainly not ready for testing.

Comment: Re:My FreeBSD Report: Four Months In (Score 2, Informative) 471

by 0100010001010011 (#48968225) Attached to: Systemd Getting UEFI Boot Loader

I assume you know that testing is a development branch and is supposed to break,

No, it's not "supposed to break". Heck I ran unstable for years and only had 1 serious problem in all that time. If you really want crazy go to experimental.

Testing is for hashing out deep and difficult bugs not "This is a complete POS"

Comment: Re:I think Nintendo Wii was powerglove 2.0 (Score 1) 40

by 0100010001010011 (#48849547) Attached to: Nintendo Power Glove Used To Create 'Robot Chicken'

I don't think the true "PowerGlove" successor has come yet.

A smart glove like this could turn any ordinary squeeze ball into a chording keyboard. With Google Glass and other similar technologies chording keyboards and wearable tech would work for rapid next input without voice. Anyone that has played GuitarHero knows how a chording keyboard can work.

Comment: Re:Spoofing! (Score 1) 199

It would actually be a perfect device for simulating the EPA test cycle. It would be a perfect way to sell it legally. The EPA cycle is "the" test for cars in the US so there are plenty of professionals that would love a tool. Some simulation software starts at $5k/license. (CANalyzer). No one says you have to sell your device with 'encryption' so that the EPA cycle would be replaced with whatever cycle you wanted.

Or you could just do it with a cheap uC board these days. These guys are building a engine EFI controller with a $14 circuit board as the base. Even having to spoof their own messages With an ODB/CAN simulator you could easily

And maybe someone would then finally make a legitimate cheap CAN/ODBBluetooth reader instead of clones of clones or a chip that is ages old to read data as well. USBCAN cables from good vendors start at $500 even though the functionality is built into a lot of new chips.

Comment: Re:Before reading TFA ... (Score 1) 245

by 0100010001010011 (#48804151) Attached to: PHP vs. Node.js: the Battle For Developer Mind Share

save time writing 3 versions,

Did I say write 3 versions? Just do all of the JIT compiling NOT on my computer.

JIT to pre-compiled

That's the point. Why are we using the battery power of thousands of tiny little ARM devices to compile something that could have been compiled once?

When you boot your Laptop do you recompile everything just so you can grab the source daily?

Comment: Re:Before reading TFA ... (Score 1) 245

by 0100010001010011 (#48802901) Attached to: PHP vs. Node.js: the Battle For Developer Mind Share

So use it like html5 video and have javascript backup.

script x64="uselessWidgetJavascript.x64" x32="uselessWidgetJavascript.x86" javascript="uselessWidgetJavascript.js"

If you lumped 90% of all internet devices on the web they'd probably fall under x86, x64, & ARM.

Additionally Apple has figured out how to do fat binaries.

Comment: Re:Before reading TFA ... (Score 2) 245

by 0100010001010011 (#48802291) Attached to: PHP vs. Node.js: the Battle For Developer Mind Share

script type="x64"

I don't want something else that my computer has to interpret. Do all the compiling before it shows up on my computer so that I don't have to deal with this: http://i.imgur.com/b2uUrIL.png

Even "JIT" compilers start to suck when you have a few dozen of them running at the same time.

It is much easier to suggest solutions when you know nothing about the problem.

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