Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Transferring Domains from Uncooperative Registrar? 90

Posted by Cliff
from the time-for-a-good-lawyer dept.
An anonymous reader asks: "What do you do when your registrar hangs you out to dry? I have a domain that was registered with a registrar that no longer exists. The original registrar was bought out by another, who is a reseller for a third registrar. After the buyout they never got my domain to work properly with their billing system, with the result that I cannot transfer the domain (they say they cannot release registrar-lock) and cannot renew it via their online system, meaning that I have to call them on the phone. Several weeks ago, my registrar took my renewal payment for two years, and charged my credit card, but never renewed the domain. They expired it and redirected the web accesses to their parking page, which consists of spam links. I've emailed and called them several times since, with the result that they no longer answer my email or phone calls. I can't find any clear documentation at ICANN about this, as it all seems to be geared toward transfers from uncooperative web hosts or copyright holders. Do I have any recourse in this case, or am I simply screwed?"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Transferring Domains from Uncooperative Registrar?

Comments Filter:
  • Re:Snipe it (Score:2, Insightful)

    by mysidia (191772) on Friday October 27, 2006 @08:16PM (#16617790)

    Actually.. I think disputing the charges should be done as a last resort, if you decide it is futile, and you will just surrender the domain (allow them to expire it).

    Once you succeed with a dispute, you will no longer have paid for the very domain you didn't want expired; you might have a heck of a time convincing a judge that you should get to keep both the domain and the money.

    It may be more beneficial even to do research and prepare the paperwork + evidence gathering yourself, to petition for judgement, whether in real court, or small claims. Assuming they fail to provide a satisfactory response to letters you can prove they received.

    I am assuming the nominal charge for the domain is not in fact the major issue, that you wouldn't be happy at all if you had to switch domains, or it would cost you significantly more than the registration fees, if you were to lose the domain to someone else.

One small step for man, one giant stumble for mankind.

Working...