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Comment Re:Should have used APPS! (Score 1) 107

Wikipedia is your friend.

I won't spoil it for you, but early in the industrial revolution a man with the lad name "Ludd" started a movement to try and halt the spread of mechanization via acts of sabotage. The basic feature was fear of new methods and technologies.

People who subscribed to his ideology were called "Luddites". In more modern parlance, the term refers to anyone who is resistant to adopting new tech.

Comment Re:ASLR was a dumb idea while it lasted (Score 4, Interesting) 71

define malware.

this would be useful for killing some of the more nasty forms of drm, for instance. a runtime patcher could learn exactly where to patch, and booya.

the more idiots trying to count chickens before they hatch thart get their eggs smashed, the happier i am. maybe they will one day learn that they cant have *all* of the pie, no matter how much they want it.

Comment Obvious takeaway here? (Score 5, Insightful) 41

And there is no broad picture to take away from this?

Such as, if prepubescent school kids (not the mist shining example of intellectual prowess) are not a good target for this tool, how would it be effective against domestic terror agents, or even foreign terror agents?

They imply it only collects the public data available-- not the private data. It is therefore only useful as a tool to make associations with, and make inferences, using otherwise beniegn data points.

Unless the school has an interest in being the thought police, or trying to make Joe McCarthy's ghost blush, it is no wonder they did not find it useful.

Given thus finding, what does this say about the CIA's goals?

Comment Re:one in every home? (Score 1) 227

Or, need a way to transport large sums of energy from where bulk generation is possible to where demand for that energy is high, and do so with minimal losses.

This looks like the latter.

It solves the problem of " how do you intend to get all that power from that coastal windfarm to the city where it is needed?"

The answer? "In a big assed fuel tanker."

Comment Re:Cost? (Score 4, Informative) 227

To collect the ethanol, the water being treated needs to be isolated from the rest of the reactant supply (aka, the ocean). The availability of local power from ocean wave generators, or tidal generators means the expense of using reverse osmosis is possible to account for. We don't need a membrane that makes clean water, just one that holds ethanol in, and that keeps plankton and microbes out.

Ethanol is a fairly large molecule (compared to salt, or co2), and microbes are downright huge in comparison.

Automated jets of ocean water against the membrane to knock plankton off every so often, coupled with a maintenance schedule, and such platforms could be extracting ethanol in huge amounts cheaply, expelling very clean ocean brine.

Assuming the catalyst can endure salt being present anyway.

Comment Re:Cost? (Score 4, Informative) 227

Which efficiency?

Energy use wise, or product synthesis wise?

The summary gives the latter at just over 60%.
The former? Who knows?

I am more interested in how sensitive to poisoning the catalyst is. Would exposure to salt water damage it, for instance.

If not, then huge installations of these in the open ocean coupled with tidal force generators or wave mechanic generators for the electrical power needed could make drilling for oil obsolete, while simultaneously directly removing the cause of ocean acidification. Win win.

Comment Re:Help! Where should I go? (Score 1) 124

People like "spacenutter" guy, and the general "science is bad because it says my fixation on driving a hummer without justifiable cause" type idiocy has made it unpleasant to push discussion that direction. Endless postings about " your mom's superfluid" and the like.

In short, idiots outnumber the wise, and the wise, wisely remain silent.

Comment she sounds like a chatbot (Score 5, Interesting) 145

her responses are not that dynamic, imo. She sounds like an ordinary chatbot. Given the budget clearly spent on her construction, I strongly suspect that most of the software dev time was spent on her motor control system, and less so on her human dialog systems.

This would make sense to me.

I think if they hooked her up to a female voiced watson instance, she would be quite a bit more capable.

I have never understood the fixation that people have for elaborate physical platforms though. Nearly all of the literature suggests that the uncanny valley only gets deeper as humanoid appearance becomes more lielike, as long as interaction is machine like and limited.

about the only benefit i see here is to divest ignorant investors of their money.

Human level intelligence is not currently possible with our current computing capabilities, and probably wont be for quite some time. Dont get me wrong here, I think research should continue, but now is not the time to be investing research dollars on fancy humanoid bodies. That money is much better spent on actual machine learning, machne language, and machine vision research (all are parts of the big umbrella of AI, but those are actually useful and essential if the goal is synthetic sentience)

fancy robot bodies? much less so, imo.

those should come AFTER we have more capable AIs that can more meaningfully interact with humans.

Comment Re:Phrasing. (Score 5, Informative) 134

No joke. In any other industry, where producers "work together" to set pricing models, set up and maintain artificial scarcity, lock out competition, and do this to "ensure success", we call it conspiracy, collusion, and racketeering.

But it is somehow different for the entertainment industry.

For mysterious reasons, that are perfectly rational, and not at all tied to campaign kickbacks and political donations. No sir, not at all.

Netflix' deal with this theatre chain certainly won't expose decades of " false" lobbyist claims about immediate availability harming tickets sales, or anything like that-- media consumers will just stay home on release day, and it will be a disaster for both of them, that's what they mean here, I am sure! It is sure to demonstrate clearly and without distortion why industry needs to work lockstep to assure its future in the face of pirates, and inexpensive streaming, and certainly won't expose any of the industry's claims to the contrary false, no sir, not possible. /s

Comment Re:Doctor Doctor Give Me The News (Score 2) 508

No, you can find it without that modifier in quite a few sultry harlequin romance novels.

Things like:

"He cleaved to her breasts with an insatiable hunger" and the like.

The phrase "Cleaved to" is ambiguous.

See above, but also see:

"while working in the butcher shop, Jimmy often cleaved to the sounds of classical music."

Does that mean he stuck with classical music nearly exclusively, or given then context, did he chop meat to the playing of classical music?

It was this ambiguity that the GP was discussing AC.


Comment Re:Doctor Doctor Give Me The News (Score 1) 508

It's been in the English vocabulary for hundreds of years. You can find it used that way in the King James bible for instance, where it discusses marriage.

Genesis 2:24
Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.

It does not mean that he will turn her into fine sliced deli meat. It means he will cling to her tightly and never let go.

Comment Re:You wouldn't download an Oreo (Score 1) 229

cocoa butter would be a better choice, but might affect flavor.

cocoanut oil is solid at room temp, white, and mostly flavorless. less healthy than cocoa butter though.

and yes, i did see that you were trying to be funny.

i just happen to feel that if you call it creme filling, it should be creamy. not a close competitor of fondant.

Comment Re:You wouldn't download an Oreo (Score 2) 229

To be honest, I am surprised it is actually lard. I always thought it was partially hydrogenated soy or cottonseed oil.

As for what I would personally use? Assuming I did not need a shelf life long enough to be able to send the cookies on a 5000 year supply mission to proxima centaur I (like with twinkies) I would use a protein based filling (aka gelatin) whipped with corn syrup and glycerol, with just a touch of unadulterated veggie oil. I would use just enough water in the whipping process to floccuate the ingredents, then dessicaate prior to shipping. the glycerol and corn syrup would keep it soft even when completely dessicated, and the dry conditions would combat spoilage.

it would eventually spoil from contact with oxygen though.

the filling would be less "sweet white paste" and more "marshmallow creme" in consistency though. probably flavor as well.

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