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Announcements

Submission + - The business case for privacy online (computerweekly.com)

Kurtz'sKompund writes: The UK Information Commissioner's Office has commissioned a study into the business case for privacy. Building on the Privacy by Design report, this project seeks to research and develop an easily understandable and compelling business case that will help organisations to justify and implement privacy protection within their business processes and systems. This is a very important piece of work — for the majority of organisations, the challenge is understanding why they should provide protection of personal information when there are so many competing calls on their budgets. http://www.computerweekly.com/blogs/the-data-trust-blog/2009/08/the-business-case-for-privacy.html
The Internet

Submission + - Russians blamed DoS attack on Twitter, et al (computerweekly.com)

Kurtz'sKompund writes: Twitter co-founder Biz Stone says the source of yesterday's denial of service attack on the microblogging service is still unknown. The attack also affected Facebook, LiveJournal, Google's Blogger and possibly even YouTube, which has led to speculation that the target was an individual not a web site. According to Facebook, what all these sites have in common is a user who is an anti-Russian blogger called Cyxymu from Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. This theory is given "credibility" by that fact that the DoS attacks coincide with the first anniversary of the start of last year's conflict between Russia and Georgia.
Security

UK National ID Card Cloned In 12 Minutes 454

Death Metal writes with this excerpt from Computer Weekly, which casts some doubt on the security of the UK's proposed personal identification credential: "The prospective national ID card was broken and cloned in 12 minutes, the Daily Mail revealed this morning. The newspaper hired computer expert Adam Laurie to test the security that protects the information embedded in the chip on the card. Using a Nokia mobile phone and a laptop computer, Laurie was able to copy the data on a card that is being issued to foreign nationals in minutes."
Security

U-Turn On UK ID Cards 143

An anonymous reader writes "The UK appears to be watering down its national ID card system, with the revelation by the government that it will now only check the cards against a central biometric database in a minority of cases. Critics are saying it not only renders the whole scheme pointless, but will pose a security risk by making it far easier to use copied or cloned cards. 'But an Identity and Passport Service spokesman denied the system would be vulnerable to fraud: 'The majority of instances where people use their identity cards will be day-to-day situations where the cards offer a convenient method of proving identity such as a young person proving their age to buy alcohol,' he said.'"
Linux Business

Submission + - Working for the man: Keeping the open source faith 1

Kurtz'sKompund writes: "More and more open-source developers these days are employees of companies, paid to work on open-source projects, rather than independent programmers doing it for fun. The change raises issues for projects, programmers and employers alike. http://www.computerworlduk.com/toolbox/open-source/open-source-business/news-analysis/index.cfm?articleid=1037"

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