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Comment That's already in place. (Score 3, Informative) 160

In Italy you are not allowed to reach some international websites, mainly related to betting.
You get directed to a generic web page (hosted at the government company SOGEI Spa) that says that you are not allowed to visit those websites.
If you are in Italy you can try http://www.ladbrokes.com/ or http://www.skybet.com/.
Can you spell "freedom" in Italian? We cannot.

Comment Re:Best Pizza? (Score 1) 920

Right. The real point is in the "expected quality" as perceived by Southern Italians.
For example, electric oven is not considered bad in Milan or Turin with wood oven perceived as an "extra".
In Southern Italy, instead, "electric oven" is simply considered inappropriate for a (real) pizzeria.
And I'm not talking about the fight for the use of cheese, mozzarella and fiordilatte or the baking powder.

Comment Best Pizza? (Score 0, Troll) 920

Whatever you have outside of southern Italy (not even Rome IMHO) that's called "pizza" is simply ridiculous.
Please, go to Napoli (Neaples for anglophones) and choose a pizzeria at random.
You'll get:
- wood oven
- mixed durum wheat
- hand made dough
- sourdough or yeast

Come and taste, anyway, before electing the winner.

Submission + - Can email carbon footprint be cut?

VincenzoRomano writes: Everyone is concerned with the carbon footprint, being that a buzz word or a real issue.
I am thinking mainly about the SPAM and the craze with graphics email signatures and "email disclaimers".
Despite a very popular belief, the Internet has a relevant carbon footprint, From the infrastructure deployment to the ongoing use.
A number of articles are available (on the Internet, thus rising the CO2 emissions) on the topic. But ...
Is there anyone taking into account the carbon footprint of a SPAM-free Internet?
SPAM is accounted for about 85% (yes, eighty-five!) of all the email traffic worldwide!
And what about those fancy colorful (and useless) signature? Those people never read the netiquette (page 5).
Despite the disclaimer phenomenon is decreasing (as far as my experience), it is still relevant in my mailbox with funny and clearly inapplicable pseudo-legal statements.
Would the would (and the Internet) be better with such a carbon cut?

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