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Comment Re:Yet another Facebook hater... (Score 1) 52

That's exactly what I said dear AC, even if I'm an Android fanboy. I know what Google is.
I said: If G+ was bigger, it would be a "Facebook 2.0". What I like in Google is that they often release source code to allow people create their community versions of Android, rooting is explained in the manual, (i.e. you don't have to wait for a hacker to decrypt the security of the mobile phone you're supposed to OWN and not to license).
Google often contributes in Linux kernel, of course it's for their own interest, but they could also keep their work for themselves.

Comment Re:Why is this news? (Score 1) 85

Hell no but the number of iPhone 5 that sold the first day needed to have been physically built already (I know not all people were satisfied anyway).
Google couldn't make such a bet stayed careful, and didn't surf on the iHype. So comparatively it's a very good score yes. And also here it's out of stock with a lot of preorders ...

Comment Re:I don't get it (Score 1) 85

It is, it's the reference Android model when there is a new (major) Android version.
But now many other manufacturers allow their phones to be rooted (e.g. HTC, Sony) given they know you are doing so. For HTC phones, an easy hack is Revolutionary (http://www.revolutionary.io). This is tanks to revolutionary that HTC allowed their devices to be rooted "legally".
Sony allows to root their phones if you subscribe to their developer program too.

Security

Submission + - FreeBSD machines recently compromised (freebsd.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Following recent compromises of the Linux kernel.org and Sourceforge, the
FreeBSD Project is now reporting that several machines have been broken
into. After a brief outage, ftp.FreeBSD.org and other services appear to be
back. The project announcement states that some deprecated services
(e.g., cvsup) may be removed rather than restored. Users are advised to
check for packages downloaded between certain dates and replace them,
although not because known trojans have been found, but rather because the
project has not yet been able to confirm that they could not exist.

Apparently initial access was via a stolen SSH key, but fortunately their
clusters were partitioned so that the effects were limited. The announcement
contains more detailed information — and we are left wondering, would
proprietary companies that get broken into so forthcoming? Should they be?

Power

Submission + - Second Life for Old Electric-Car Batteries: Guardians of the Electric Grid (nationalgeographic.com)

SternisheFan writes: Imagine a future in which old electric-car batteries are deployed in neighborhoods as energy-storage systems that guard against power outages, while paving the way for wind and solar power—and more electric cars. The idea has moved one step closer with the demonstration of a boxy unit of used Chevy Volt batteries capable of providing enough electricity to power three to five average American homes for up to two hours. Developed by General Motors and ABB, one of the world's largest electric-technology companies, the device features five lithium-ion battery packs from plug-in hybrid Volts, strung together in a new arrangement and cooled by air instead of the liquid used in their former lives on the road. The batteries are degraded below acceptable performance levels for cars, but the companies say the batteries have enough life to serve the grid for at least ten years in this device, a community energy storage unit.
    "In a car, you want immediate power, and you want a lot of it," said Alexandra Goodson, business development manager for energy storage modules at ABB. Many grid storage applications, on the other hand, involve slow, steady delivery of energy. "We're discharging for two hours instead of immediately accelerating," she said. "It's not nearly as demanding on the system."

Education

Submission + - Should we teach 11 year olds to write mobile apps? (wordpress.com)

00_NOP writes: "New proposals, commissioned by the UK government from the British Computing Society (BCS) for a computing (ICT) curriculum for schools in England have been published and they are a huge step forward from the existing teaching, now widely discredited, of how to use various "office" products.
But there is some confusion about what they actually contain: the formal proposals do not contain some of the ideas that have been spun to the media. Most eye-catchingly, this morning's reports suggest 11 year olds will be taught how to write apps for cell phones but no such proposal is in the paper from the BCS — are we about to see a new form of corporate lock-in with Google, Apple and Microsoft battling to get their technology adopted even while the real world moves on to completely new multicore paradigms?"

Transportation

German Police Stop Man With Mobile Office In Car 146

PolygamousRanchKid writes "Forget texting while driving. German police say they nabbed a driver who had wired his Ford station wagon with an entire mobile office. Saarland state police said Friday the 35-year-old man was pulled over for doing 130 kph (80 mph) in a 100 kph zone while passing a truck Monday. Built on a wooden frame on his passenger seat they found a laptop on a docking station tilted for easy driver access, a printer, router, wireless internet stick, WLAN antenna, and an inverter to power it all." I've driven some long trips with a similar passenger-seat setup (minus the printer), but of course for use only while stopped. Since the police in this case had no evidence that the rig was being used while driving, the driver was ticketed only for speeding and for having unsecured items. Really, it seems like something that Skymall should offer in neater form; now I regret not picking up a surplus police cruiser computer when they were in stock at the local Goodwill.
BSD

Submission + - Copyright reform and FOSS licenses

An anonymous reader writes: With all the constant talk of copyright reform, people often think of music, books, and videos. Free software licenses rely on their copyright to enforce their license. What happens if the copyright term is limited to 14 years, and anything GPLed will become public domain after 14 years? Windows NT could be public domain. Unix could finally be free. What affect will copyright reform have on FOSS software?
Linux

Submission + - Valve's Big Picture Could Be A Linux Game Console (theverge.com) 1

Penurious Penguin writes: Via LXer, a hopeful article at The Verge persuasively suggests that through Valve, Linux could soon become a formidable contender in the gaming arena, capable of holding its own against such giants as Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and the Wii. With 50 million users, a growing Linux team, a caboodle of interesting experiments ("Steam Box" hardware baselines, etc.) and a strong conviction that more-open platforms are the way, Valve may actually see it through.

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