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Comment Re:Obligatory XKCD for #2 (Score 1) 88

BrowserID is actually quite promising due to some really interesting design decisions. Plus it actually really usable (unlike openID) and decentralized by design (unlike facebook or google login integration). I recommend this video to learn a little about it: http://identity.mozilla.com/post/13459806252/another-introduction-to-browserid-for-webfwd

Comment Re:Making version numbers more relevant (Score 1) 330

It seems like a lot of people are asking for this. Has there been any response from mozilla about this idea? A dated version numbering system seems vastly more relevant to the end user than any other system I have seen. I would love to see this. "Grandma, you see, its 2015, but you are still running firefox 12, back from 2012, which contains many flaws that might get your social security benefits stolen"

Comment Re:Just because of speed? (Score 2) 330

I found that funny too. People complain about the rapid release cycle of firefox, then tell you to use chrome. To be fair, the second part of the argument, is that their archaic, poorly maintained mash of firefox plugins stopped working and its because of the new release schedule (which is partly true, but hardly the part of the bigger issues that firefox is facing and dealing with rather well). Google's chrome is slick now, just as firefox was back a few years ago was, but I guess I am not truly convinced that chrome wont face the same issues that firefox is facing today. Plus, It seems to me that giving into chrome and abandoning firefox hands the browser market back to the big guys to push their will onto the web, just as IE had done prior to firefox. I think chrome is a good browser, and I sometimes use it, but I find mozilla's policies fall more in line with my own regarding many aspects, and mainly stick to firefox.

Comment What isn't wrong with TV? (Score 1) 839

The shows mostly suck. You have to slog through adds. I don't know when anything is on. Its different everywhere you go. The remotes and interfaces are terribly designed. For the most part, the TV, receiver and media players don't talk to each other. Thats why I stopped watching. I want to watch whatever I want, whenever I want, without adds. If someone can provide that for REASONABLE prices I would pay, but until that happens, I guess its up to me to figure out plus a copy of XBMC.

Comment Re:rent... don't buy (Score 1) 371

I would say renting is probably the best advice. People are arguing that ripping the disks to hard drive would be effective, but holly molly, that is going to take a long time, and a crap-load of space, or an even more insane amount of time if it includes encoding the rips, especially if you your collection includes blue-ray discs. If people must hoard, you are better off leaving the ripping to the professionals. They will do a better job, and its an immense waste of time the same way media capturing is. DRM and hoarding mix terribly, so basically your only effective option is getting onto a good semi-private movie torrent site and get your movies for long term storage there.
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft Killing Silverlight (zdnet.com) 1

SharkLaser writes: Silverlight 5 might be last version released by Microsoft. Several industry insiders and partners for the last few weeks have heard from their own Microsoft sources that there won't be new versions released after Silverlight 5. Status on service packs and support for Silverlight is unclear, as Microsoft haven't yet released lifecycle support end date even for the previous Silverlight 4. By their support page they will give full year head-up before ending support. With Adobe ending development of Flash for mobile browsers and Microsoft ending development of Silverlight, HTML5 video looks a lot more promising. But will content providers be able to give out their material without DRM and how does HTML5 perform with non-video side of Flash and Silverlight?

Comment "beautiful" but not practical (Score 1) 208

Apple time capsules seem like a good idea until you actually think about what its function is, and how it was implemented. Any backup device that does not allow physical access to the storage medium is a mean, practical joke. Add in a faulty power supply that routinely dies in 18 months, its a cruel joke at that, and its exactly what a time capsule is! Networked storage devices are awesome, and a great thing to have around, but to call a backup solution that routinely dies, overheats, and prevents the end user access to the storage medium when the wrapper breaks does not count as a beautiful device.

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