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Comment Re:Too fucking bad.. (Score 2) 502

He's going to a minimum or low security facility, which is typically almost completely unsecured, and has a focus on work and job programs. We are not talking about "hard time" here. He'll be serving alongside white-collar criminals, not exactly a dangerous bunch.

The wisdom of Office Space seems applicable here.

Y'know, minimum-security prison is no picnic. I have a client in there right now. He says the trick is: kick someone's ass the first day, or become someone's bitch. Then everything will be all right. Why do you ask, anyway?

Comment Re:read between the lines (Score 1) 71

IF we're going to get mad at Google for roaming around in a car picking up SSID's than WHY can't we get mad at Zynga for taking whatever information they have about me and making money by selling it?

Because Zynga only gets the data that YOU give them; you ultimately have control over how much information Zynga gets about you. Don't want them to have information about you? Don't use their applications.

Comment Re:so... (Score 1) 412

Can you please explain why you feel this statement suggest the student hasn't grasped the substance of the lesson?

It depends on whether or not you think the student approved of the lesson. If he is endorsing the exercise, then his statement is along the lines of "We weren't actually being terrorists, we were learning about it, it's a good idea and negative reactions are overblown" and he has clearly grasped the substance of the lesson. If he was disapproving, his comment was more along the lines of "We shouldn't be pretending to be terrorists in order to learn about terrorists" and he missed the point of the exercise. So, it depends on the context of the quote given by the student.

Comment Re:Don't target cars (Score 1) 1139

I'd posit that the United States has a higher susceptibility to arguments of the form "b..b..but terrorists" (moreso than India, Spain, or Russia), and while I cannot cite specific examples of national transport projects getting held up, I'd say that it is likely to occur in the future, given proper stimuli. Consider restrictions on liquids on aircrafts, removing shoes to go through airport security, the entire Department of Homeland Security; all knee-jerk, ill-considered reactions to superficial threats. I see no reason not to assume a similar reaction could occur affecting a national transport project under the right circumstances.

This is, of course, totally different from the question of intellectually validity; but intellectual validity isn't really relevant, most of the time...

Comment FTFA (Score 2, Insightful) 187

FTFA:

...why would any law-abiding resident ever volunteer to scan their irises into a public database, and sacrifice their privacy? GRI hopes that the immediate value the system creates will alleviate any concern... And he has a warning for those thinking of opting out: "When you get masses of people opting-in, opting out does not help. Opting out actually puts more of a flag on you than just being part of the system. We believe everyone will opt-in."

If you're a law-abiding citizen, you have nothing to hide, and thus couldn't possibly object.

what the FUCK

Comment Re:It's just a toy (Score 1) 185

...longer than 15 minutes at a time, it's not a good idea -- you'll hand will get sore in no time.

Maybe they anticipate that their users will have lots of practice making repetitive hand motions for extended periods of time and will be able to avoid this problem. Can't imagine why, though.

Comment When I was in school... (Score 2, Funny) 663

When I was in elementary school, the only class I could stand was gym class. So, I would stick it out through the day until gym class, after which I would develop serious symptoms that demanded I be sent home. As it so happened, gym almost always was scheduled directly after lunch. I was a good enough actor that my symptoms usually got attention even if they didn't get me sent home, which led to all sorts of theories about why I was mysteriously sick, usually focusing on the food that I ate for lunch... all sorts of allergies and intolerances were postulated, and more than once my parents got furiously angry at various administrators for the food they were serving in the cafeteria. Eventually, somebody realized what was really going on, and it all got quietly dropped.

So in conclusion, kids will pretend to be sick to get out of school, and parents will come up with crazy theories to avoid concluding that's what's going on.

Comment A new way to escape jury duty (Score 1) 321

Probably would only work in the local/regional court, but:

Judge: "Any reason you think you would be biased for or against this defendant?"
Jury candidate #1: "Well, I'm pretty sure I saw him pop up in my facebook newsfeed for driving drunk."
Defense Lawyer: "Dismissed."

Would work best when the defendant is charged with something vaguely related but not the same as DUI, like disorderly conduct or domestic violence.

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