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Comment Re:Good riddance (Score 1) 95

Are huge TVs a US thing? I never saw a DLP TV in anyone's home, only at trade shows.

Bigger rooms, bigger TVs. I grew up in Europe before moving to the US and living rooms were much smaller than typical US living rooms. A 50" TV is pretty much the minimum around here.

Comment Re:Good riddance (Score 1) 95

Consumer Reports did a test in the mid-2000s and found about 5000 hours per bulb on average. How long that is depends on how many hours a day you keep the TV on...

Guess I got lucky. My Samsung DLP (HLN series) is from 2004. 11,000 hours on the original bulb and still works fine. Haven't had a single problem with this TV.

Comment General purpose robot (Score 1) 88

Robotics today is where computers were in the 1960's. Back then computers were built for specific tasks, but were not intended to do stuff they weren't specifically designed for. It took the general purpose computers of the 70's and 80's to start the computer revolution. Same thing is needed in robotics. A general purpose robot platform; modular, upgradable and programmable. I'd love to have a robot for all the boring everyday tasks like cleaning, unloading the dishwasher, make my morning coffee and so on.

Comment Re:Methinks people don't appreciate the scales her (Score 2) 299

The problem with constant acceleration is energy. It doesn't really matter how long or how hard you're accelerating, with 100% matter to energy conversion and a photon drive (100% energy to thrust), you would only be able to reach 0.6c by converting half your ship's mass. A constant 1g trip to anywhere interesting would take unimaginable amounts of energy.

Why ignore interstellar space? It's not empty by far. Use a ram-scoop and feed the hydrogen into your (fusion) reactor. At 0.9x c your ram-scoop will collect quite a lot of hydrogen.

Comment Re:This has been happening for a long time. (Score 1) 53

I've done some tech updates to my '71 Corvette. The 4-speed manual tranny is upgraded to a modern 5-speed with overdrive. The engine has aluminum heads, full roller valve train and EFI. The ECU sits behind the passenger dash and has a RS232 connector so I can calibrate fuel and ignition timing timing from a netbook sitting in the passenger seat. And yes, I pull over before piddling with the netbook. It has data logging so I don't have to watch it while driving.

Comment Re:There are no Facts (Score 1) 1469

The victim of rape should not be punished. And being forced to birth the child of your rapist is an unimaginably cruel punishment that wouldn't even be fit for a convicted criminal.

Better let the muslim world know. There are parts where the rapist can get off the crime if they marry the person they rape. Though in most cases the girl simply commits suicide.

Doesn't the Bible have the same provision?

Comment Re:Not me!! (Score 1) 181

Depending on the rear gears you probably would want to keep it around 70 mph or so. Without overdrive these cars get noisy and thirsty at higher speeds.

Unless it has really steep (high numerically) rear gears and you keep it at 70 mph it should easily give you 15-18 mpg, even with the 455 engine.

Comment Re:If Obama's BIRTH can be an issue (Score 1) 571

An American GI here, I have experienced the healthcare in Australia and England, all I can say is if the health care in those countries is dubious then the health care in the US is atrocious. Why is it most Americans that criticize the health care in Europe, Canada and Australia have never experienced it first hand and just take it for granted ours is better?

I've experienced healthcare in Europe (Sweden) and the US. The care I received in the US was vastly superior. The costs of US healthcare are ridiculous and the insurance business is insane, but if I needed urgent care I'd much prefer it happened while I was in the US.

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