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Intel

Submission + - Ask an Intel IT drone

Jeff Moriarty writes: "[MODERATOR: My email is jeff.moriarty@intel.com if you would like to talk about this directly. Feel free to edit the text as you see fit.]

I work in IT at Intel, am one of Intel's "official" IT bloggers, and am looking for a little abuse. Intel launched these external IT blogs late last year to open the lines of communication, and perhaps show the world we're not entirely as evil as you may have heard. Since I've been given some leeway in talking about Intel as a blogger, I thought I'd push things a bit and see what the Slashdot crew would like to know.

I've been at Intel seven years, all of it in IT, but I'm not an Intel apologist. We do great things, and we do ridiculous things. Intel IT really gets to see both sides of the coin, trying to contribute to Intel's bottom line by supporting our products, but facing the same technical and budgetary challenges as most of our customers. I'm hoping our blogs and this Q&A will help us share how we deal with those challenges. All IT related questions are fair game, as are personal questions about working at Intel, our culture, etc. Give me the Top Ten, and if I don't know the answer, I'll ask around until I find someone who does. I've got my kevlar armor on, so bring the love."
Security

Submission + - Fingerprinting the World's Mail Servers

ttul writes: "This O'Reilly SysAdmin Article describes some work done by mod_perl author Stas Bekman and his colleagues at anti-spam software company MailChannels to fingerprint the world's publicly visible email servers. Interesting results from the survey? Open source options like Sendmail and Postfix are still firmly in the lead after all these years, but commercial services like Postini are catching up fast. The article goes into some detail on how email servers can be fingerprinted despite attempts by sysadmins to cloak their identity."
Power

Submission + - Offshore Wind Farms are set to battle bad storms

abramsv writes: "New floating wind farms are located off Denmark's West coast in the North Sea, which is considered to be one of the roughest stretches of water in the world — 8 to 10 meter waves are expected at the site... Based on data determining that average wind speeds at sea are higher than on land, the modern offshore wind farms promise to be exceptionally energy efficient — but it still remains to be seen whether or not these long-bladed Goliaths will survive the harshest of North Sea storms."

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