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Comment It doesn't say JUST the name. (Score 3, Informative) 510

I just read the law. It defines personal information as: ...a Massachusetts resident's first name and last name or first initial and last name IN COMBINATION WITH any one or more of the following data elements that relate to such resident: (a) Social Security number; (b) driver's license number or state-issued identification card number; or (c) financial account number, or credit or debit card number... [capitalization mine, for emphasis.] IOW, a customer database is fine- it doesn't have to be encrypted, unless you also store the customers' Social security numbers, drivers license numbers, or credit card data. Without any of that stuff, you're just storing data you could have obtained from scanning a phone book.

Comment Re:Who exactly is fighting back? (Score 1) 641

Seems to me including at least two decimal places would be expected from the scientific community

What would be expected from the scientific community is that they present result data with only the precision of the measurements used to compute it. I learned that in eighth grade science class. Why didn't you (and the climate "scientists"?) Aggregated data from hundreds or thousands of thermometers with precisions of at BEST a tenth of a degree, many of which are in dark painted boxes exposed to sunlight, or near air conditioners, or black-topped parking lots, does NOT produce results accurate to hundredths of a degree. Showing numbers like 14.72 can be intended only to fool the public into believing their data is far more accurate than it actually is. It apparently works. On you, anyway.

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