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Journal Journal: Not being Employed

Years, a online dot-com company, years of programming experience, and a long CV of previous work, is not getting me a job in the current conditions.
Being out of work for 18 months now, and getting poor.

Submission + - Russian find a new particle (science20.com)

physburn writes: "The Russian Dubna Nuctron accelerator has reported finded a new elementary particle. The E(38) Boson at 38 MeV, it interacts only with quarks and gluons, but decays (via quark diagrams) into pairs of photons. The particle was previously reported in February from data from the BaBar experiment, and the new data seems to confirm its existence."
Hardware

Submission + - A Quantum Computer Finds Factors - 15 mostly equals 3x5 (i-programmer.info)

mikejuk writes: The Shor quantum factoring algorithm has been run for the first time on a solid state device and it successfully factored a composite number. A team from UCSB has managed to build and operate a quantum circuit composed of four superconducting phase qubits. The design creates entangled bits faster than before and the team verified that entanglement was happening using quantum tomography. The final part of the experiment implemented the Shor factoring algorithm using 15 as the value to be factored. In 150,000 runs of the calculation, the chip gave the correct result 48% of the time. As Shor's algorithm is only supposed to give the correct answer 50% of the time, this is a good result. Is this the start of the quantum computing revolution?
Space

Submission + - Earth's Corner of the Galaxy Just Got a Little Lonelier

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Only 4 stars, including Barnard's Star, are within 6 light years of the Sun, and only 11 are within 10 light years. That's why Barnard's star, popularized in Robert Forward's hard-sf novel, "Flight of the Dragonfly," is often short-listed as a target for humanity's first interstellar probe. Astronomers have long hoped to find a habitable planet around it, an alien Earth that might someday bear the boot prints of a future Neil Armstrong, or the tire tracks of a souped-up 25th-century Curiosity rover. But now Ross Anderson reports that a group of researchers led by UC Berkeley's Jieun Choi have delivered the fatal blow to Barnard's Star when they revealed the results of 248 precise Doppler measurements that were designed to examine the star for wobbles indicative of planets around it. The measurements, taken over a period of 25 years, led to a depressing conclusion: "the habitable zone around Barnard's star appears to be devoid of roughly Earth-mass planets or larger . . . [p]revious claims of planets around the star by van de Kamp are strongly refuted." NASA's Kepler space telescope, which studies a group of distant Milky Way stars, has found more than 2,000 exoplanet candidates in just the past two years, leading many to suspect that our galaxy is home to billions of planets, a sizable portion of which could be habitable. "This non-detection of nearly Earth-mass planets around Barnard’s Star is surely unfortunate, as its distance of only 1.8 parsecs would render any Earth-size planets valuable targets for imaging and spectroscopy, as well as compelling destinations for robotic probes by the end of the century.""

Comment Re:IMHO gravity neutrinos (Score 1) 275

hmm, yes mass and energy are same thing, but that c squared factor means you don't get much gravity per Joule. How much energy have you got in one of those capacitors, yes the electricity moves fast, at the 1/3 c. But if you want a gravity of detectable quantities, i think you'd be better off wiggling a massive object quickly.

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