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Space

Submission + - The tech behind Felix Baumgartner's stratospheric skydive (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "Felix Baumgartner has successfully completed his stratospheric skydive from 128,000 feet (39km), breaking a record that was set 52 years ago by Air Force Captain Joe Kittinger — that much we know. From the balloon, to the capsule, to the gear that Baumgartner wore during his 730 mph (1174 kph) free fall, the technology behind the scenes is impressive, and in some cases bleeding edge. ExtremeTech takes a deep dive into the tech that kept Baumgartner alive during the three-hour ascent and (much shorter) descent — and the tech that allowed us to watch every moment of the Red Bull Stratos mission live, as captured by no less than 15 digital cameras and numerous other scientific instruments."
The Military

Submission + - US Navy Cruiser and Submarine Collide (usatoday.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Despite billions of dollars in advanced electronics, radars,and sonar it seems the Navy needs to install backup cameras on their boats. "The Pentagon said late Saturday that it is investigating why a Navy submarine collided with an Aegis cruiser during routine operations at an undisclosed location."
EU

Submission + - Galileo: Europe's version of GPS reaches key phase (bbc.co.uk) 1

another random user writes: The third and fourth spacecraft in Europe's satellite navigation system have gone into orbit. The pair were launched on a Russian Soyuz rocket from French Guiana.

It is an important milestone for the multi-billion-euro project to create a European version of the US Global Positioning System.

With four satellites now in orbit — the first and second spacecraft were launched in 2011 — it becomes possible to test Galileo end-to-end. That is because a minimum of four satellites are required in the sky for a smartphone or vehicle to use their signals to calculate a positional fix.

Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft's appologises for epic fail presentation in Oslo (news.com.au)

kaptink writes: Microsoft has gone on the defensive this week after a clip from their latest developers conference started making the rounds featuring classy lyrics such as "The words MICRO and SOFT don't apply to my penis". The audience of programmers were not amused, and naturally turned to Twitter to get their hate on.

"For those not here, we had flashing disco lights, bad lyrics about penis, disco beats and dancing azure girls, so cringeworthy," one programmer tweeted.

"Wow #microsoft this music thing is probably the most embarrassing I've ever seen and heard," tweeted another.

See it all here — http://youtu.be/TROd29XFHY0

Submission + - Neal Stephenson reinventing computer swordfighting (kickstarter.com)

toxygen01 writes: "Neal Stephenson, sci-fi writer mostly known for Snowcrash and Cryptonomicon books, takes on revolutionizing virtual sword fighting with help of crowdfunding. Inspired by a little known fictional universe "Mongoliad", an interactive book he is participating on, his company is trying to develop hardware (low-latency motion controller) and software for realistic medieval sword fighting. From what is promised, it will try to be open for other developers by having API and SDK available for further modding."
Software

Submission + - Back to EE, stay in software, or go executive? 2

An anonymous reader writes: I've been happily working in a small team of great people on scientific research software, but our funding dried up. Then in the 11th hour, it seems I'm not being let go after all — for another year at least.

Assuming the worst, I went for interviews and had an offer — but not in the city where I have my small family. So when my old boss (himself a generous, if eccentric engineer trying to retire) offered me a gig making use of my fading EE skills, I accepted. Recently, he caught me by surprise — saying his small (< 10) business servicing the energy sector would do better if I represented it.

What does Slashdot think of jumping way outside your comfort zone by considering such a drastic (premature for late 20s?) career jump? His rationale is, "if I can do it, you can too". And what of research software vs industrial/EE?
Android

Submission + - Linaro speeds up Android (liliputing.com)

Argon writes: "From the article:

"The folks behind the Linaro open source software project have put a little time into tweaking Google Android to use the gcc 4.7 toolchain. The result is a version of Android that can perform many tasks between 30 and 100 percent faster than the version of Android Google 4.0 Google currently offers through the AOSP (Android Open Source Project)."

Note that there are CPU optimizations only since they have only access to binary blobs for GPU code."

Submission + - WikiLeaks in the Press: warmongering with Iran, Spain 15-M protest, media impact (wikileaks-press.org)

WLPress writes: "Independent journalist Abdulelah Haider Shaye is still incarcerated for his story on how a US drone strike in Yemen killed civilians, backed up by WikiLeaks cables. Stratfor emails contain extensive discussion of a potential attack on Iran. Other emails discussed the importance of Spain’s 15-M protest leaders. Columbia newspaper El Espectador was a Stratfor source for Colombian news, and was also a former WikiLeaks media partner for Cablegate."
Privacy

Submission + - Almost 800 Major Companies support CISPA Bill (worldrealnews.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: World Real News has compiled an alphabetic list of 796 companies that support the CISPA cyber-intelligence sharing bill currently waiting in the senate. A cursory glance at the list of supporters reveals that almost everybody who is anybody in the corporate world is behind CISPA, from IBM, Intel and AMD, to Microsoft, Apple, Adobe and Facebook, to Exxon, Ford, Fujitsu, Goldman Sachs, General Electric and NTT Docomo. The picture that emerges from studying this list is almost tragic: While most grassroots internet users want to see this bill killed, because it would seriously encroach on everybody's right to internet privacy, just about every major corporation in the world seems to want to see CISPA pass, and backs it openly. It seems that the "war for the internet" may have turned into a "war between ordinary internet users, and large corporations/multinationals". Who will win this war at the end of the day is anybody's guess, but the list of corporate CISPA supporters sure is impressively long.

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