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Comment Let's leave the 90s behind... (Score 1) 25

The only "wearable computer" I want is a HUD in my spectacles. Wearable computing is not a new idea... Shit, the Dick Tracy watch was imagined before wearable computing was even a catch phrase. Let's call it something different, though... Wearable computers makes me think of the Tron Guy. The best one I have heard so far is "Mobile Computing."

For some real next level shit, check out Ubiquitous Computing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubiquitous_computing . That's _really_ the future. ;-)

M

Comment Re:Every person's right (Score 1) 838

I live in Oregon, and our death with dignity act is one of the reasons I want to die here. To dispel some myths that anyone can use Dr. assisted suicide:

a. You have to be able to take a regiment of dozens of pills on your own. (People here are trying to change that as some debilitating diseases affect this ability.)
b. You have to have a terminal disease and a physician has to sign off that you will die in the next six months.
c. Your doctor, you, and two witnesses need to sign (one of the witnesses cannot be related to you, be in your will, be your doctor, or be a health care professional) paperwork to verify the procedure.
d. The patient must have sound mental judgement at the time of the decision.
e. The patient may rescind at any time.

There have been no known cases of abuse of this law to date.

If you want to know more, educate yourself by starting here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Dyrw71DOtLk .

Comment Re:...and develop iOS on their iPads? (Score 1) 577

Mod parent up and great grand parent up.

Apple just changed how colleges have to present their products. There's requirements like: each Apple product must have X' of dedicated floor space, store must sell $65K+ product a year, must have product displayed in high traffic area. We had a small shop that sold to incoming students and was there as more of a service.

So we dropped selling Apple products on campus just as all the students are bringing them on campus. Smart Apple. Real fucking smart.

We still bought a couple hundred Macs for our annual replacement, but we did it through standard purchasing rather than being a reseller.... We now purchase little Mac Mini servers for departmental servers instead of Xserves. We still rack 'em since Apple hasn't embraced virtualization at all... They stopped selling XRAIDs all together. They are getting out of commodity hardware and more into media delivery. The iPad is a consumption device and for most users it's probably sufficient.

They also just announced not needing to have a computer to sync and backup your iPads and iPhones and iGizmos, so yeah, they're getting away from most users using Mac OS X. I don't thing MacOS will ever go away, but it will most likely be a "development" kit or whatever.
 

Comment Re:Fuck yeah (Score 1) 123

AC's got a point, but people live in different circumstances in different parts of their lives.

When I graduated college, my Dad said, "Go to where you can get a job." Well, it was 2002 and there was another tech slump, so I was applying to jobs as a recent graduate with much more qualified applicants in the pool. So I decided to move where I wanted to live. It took me a while, but I found good work as a network admin.

Plus a job isn't a life. That's the point the AC is making. You can find work anywhere. I'm serious. You just need the skills people want. My skill set is broad and not very deep (except for in CS/IT) so I can work in a lot of sectors. Life is way more than a job. And people that focus too much on their career lose balance and miss out on living life.

As a bonus for choosing my city before my job: I started my family after having a solid job in a place I wanted to live.

Comment Cheap (Score 1) 136

Google's smart.

Middle of nowhere, but close to Bend, OR which underwent a real estate boom and bust. So I'm imagining real estate is dirt cheap. Lot's of outdoor sports, breweries, and boutique shops in Bend, so Googlers or Googlites or Googlies will have a place to romp. Not to mention the weed is fantastic from Eugene...

As well, this the east side of the Cascades, so there are many microclimates ranging from high desert to rain forest to lush valleys. Night time is always frigid. Lots of wind power access.

Smart.

Comment Walled Gardens (Score 1) 1

iOS and console manufacturers like control and money. They _want_ to sell games that people play for 5 minutes and then ditch. They lower the opportunity cost to lower than retail stores, but nothing can compete with free. They're scared it will mess up their business models. I just don't see homebrew games happening despite really wanting them to.

I homebrew beer, and I can only distribute it for free (law just passed in Oregon a few weeks ago.) Before then I wasn't legally allowed to bring homebrew out of my house to serve to someone... for free. I'm sure the Oregon Liquor Control Commission lobbied against that law.

http://gov.oregonlive.com/bill/2011/SB444/

M

Sony

Submission + - "Humble Homebrew Collection" petitions Sony (neowin.net) 1

neokushan writes: "The Humble Homebrew Collection is an initiative that aims to convince Sony to provide us with a legitimate and official way to create homebrew applications for the consoles that we own.

        We are providing you with a free homebrew game that aims to be polished and look professionally made which includes 33 very good and addictive puzzle games. We've tried to make this homebrew games collection as good as possible so that even the anti-homebrew purists will be jealous of it.

        Homebrew does not equal piracy, and this is proof of it. These games are all free and are released under the MIT license."

Politics

Submission + - SPAM: 10 Steps to Defeat the Corporatocracy

wbradleyjr1 writes: "Many Americans know that the United States is not a democracy but a "corporatocracy," in which we are ruled by a partnership of giant corporations, the extremely wealthy elite and corporate-collaborator government officials. However, the truth of such tyranny is not enough to set most of us free to take action. Too many of us have become pacified by corporatocracy-created institutions and culture."
Link to Original Source
Biotech

Submission + - Human Skin Cells Converted Directly to Neurons (stanford.edu) 1

Dr. Eggman writes: Standford's School of Medicine brings us an update in the latest achievements towards in-vitro neuron generation via re differentiation of specialized cells (skin cells in this case.) This important progress follows on last year's success in inducing this change with mice skin cells.

The importance of this line of research lies in that the process does not need to first de-differentiate the skin cells into a kind of stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells. By skipping this phase, the process avoids potential problems in the body's rejection of the iPS cells.

Amazingly, the transformation occurs with the added presence of 4 proteins (one more protein than need to induce the effect in mice) over several weeks (compared to a few days in mice.) Research continues as the study highlights the significant differences in mice and human neural cells as well as the success rate of transformation (2-4% for human cells, 20% for mice.) The resultant cells aren't yet as capable as naturally derived neurons; generating less-robust electrical signals.

IT

Submission + - Volkswagen Aims To Build 'Rolling Computer' (computerworld.com) 1

CWmike writes: "The road Volkswagen wants to take in building cars is one that infuses them with intelligence, connectivity and new kinds of capabilities. Warren Ritchie, CIO of Volkswagen Group of America, calls this vehicle an intelligent device that really is more or less 'a rolling computer.' To help reach that goal, Ritchie is also building a different kind of IT organization that is more integrated with the business. And he is doing this at the same time that business units are declaring independence from IT by buying their own touch screens and cloud services. The car of the future will be both a product and a service, hence the need for even more integration. Such a vehicle will have the ability to sense and diagnose a fault, recommend a fix, check on the availability of a part at a dealer or warehouse, and even offer scheduling options to the owner. This is a vehicle that will be connected to back-end systems, said Ritchie, speaking at Forrester's IT Forum here."

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