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Comment Re:Easier to prove conclusion wrong (Score 4, Informative) 386

If you are so sure it exists, just prove it

It's hard to prove that free will exists [...]

John Conway and Simon Conway, at Princeton IAS, did some work on this: Free Will Theorem. Depending on who you ask, their result is fairly obvious or quite deep.

Conway did a series of video lectures on the subject, see here here.

Comment Re:Great comeback (Score 1) 59

It has been developed in response to the disclosure of state mass surveillance programmes by the whistleblower Edward Snowden.

So their answer to state mass surveillance programmes is more state mass surveillance programmes?

Of course! Their answer to needle-in-haystack problems is always to add hay.

Comment Re:Schooling, perhaps? (Score 3, Insightful) 519

I'm not sure European unions operate the same way American ones do. For one thing much of Europe doesn't have a political system where influence is correlated to forking over cash to politicians. Not nearly to the same extent anyway. Meaning they get to spend contributions toward collective bargaining.

Having said that, I guess some of the above posts are just reflexive "unions baad" bleats.

Comment Re:Star Trek not so much (Score 3, Interesting) 99

I am not liking Capaldi or the new writing though, it just tries too hard to be deep and avant garde anymore.

Have to disagree about Capaldi. Tennant got the right balance of dark and light, but I thought Smith was just all fluff, so I like that Capaldi's Doctor is rougher, grizzly even. But then I was a huge fan of The Thick of It.

The writing, yeah I miss Russell T. Davies. Moffat is clearly a talented writer (I love what he did with Sherlock) but the best episodes of the Who reboot, for me, are basically all Russell. And Torchwood doesn't look like coming back either, I'd probably rate seasons 3 and 4 over all of Who.

Shame Neil Gaiman didn't do more.

Comment Re:National level? (Score 2) 171

A couple of billionaires are exploring that issue right now. The quantities of precious and heavy metals contained in some asteroids is valued in the trillions.

The preciousness of those materials is in its rarity. If the amount of gold on earth suddenly triples, it'll presumably affect its value. Well, unless we make some arbitrary distinction like the one that attaches different value to artificial vs natural diamond, which everybody accepts for romantic reasons (and to keep De Beers filthy rich).

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