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Google

Submission + - Google Says Some Apple Inventions Are So Great They Ought to Be Shared (allthingsd.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: In attempting to fend off Apple’s suit against Motorola Mobility and advancing its own patent litigation against Apple, Google, which is facing a lot of regulatory scrutiny in the U.S. and abroad over what some allege is abuse of standard essential patents, has been arguing that proprietary non-standardized technologies that become ubiquitous due to their popularity with consumers should be considered de facto standards.
Android

Submission + - Gooseberry Launches Android-based Raspberry Pi Rival (tomshardware.com)

masternerdguy writes: "

The manufacturer claims that the Gooseberry is "roughly 3 x more powerful in processing power", and twice the RAM (512 MB) than the Raspberry Pi. The Gooseberry does not come with analog video and lacks a LAN port, but supports Wi-Fi. At this time, the board only supports Android 4 ICS and Ubuntu without graphics acceleration. However, Gooseberry is offering premade images for Ubuntu. Support for Arch Linux is "expected in the future".

"

Network

Submission + - Europe Gets Pay-As-You-Go Satellite Broadband (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "Europe is set to get pay-as-you-go high speed satellite broadband from Avanti's Ka-band HYLAS1 satellite in the 26.5 — 40GHz range. Avanti says satellite broadband services have improved massively including a far better uplink than used to be available, though the round-trip latency can't be improved much."

Comment charge for launch ! = cost for launch (Score 1) 102

Some people are thinking that the advertised cost of 10m per 225kg means that his costs are the same as Pegasus. They do not realize that branson would not start in the market at his lowest profitable point. If market price is 20k per kg, but I can do it for 5k, I'll just take the extra profit until the market catches up!

Comment Re:Two things holding up asteroid tracking (Score 1) 279

I would think orbital mechanics plays a part that eliminates markovian analysis. ( ie, large object breaks up into smaller pieces, which stay largely in the same orbital path, hence the perseid's meteor showers :)
Haley's comet as a predictable 75 year orbit, why wouldnt there be stuff with 100, 500, 1000, 10000 year orbits that cross our path ?

Games

Submission + - Elder Scrolls MMO to be revealed soon by Bethesda (tech-stew.com)

techfun89 writes: Move over Knights of the Old Republic, we may have a new player in town. For some time its been rumored that an Elder Scrolls MMO will be coming, with news of it soon, possibly in May. Sources claim that Bethesda is working on the MMO project and this project will be a big feature of E3 this June.

The Elder Scrolls MMO will apparently take place hundreds of years, if not 1000 years, before Morrowind, Oblivion and Skyrim.

GNU is Not Unix

Submission + - Linux-Libre becomes an official GNU package; Linux-Libre-3.3-gnu released (gnu.org)

JucaBlues writes: "Linux, the kernel developed and distributed by Linus Torvalds et al, contains non-Free Software, i.e., software that does not respect your essential freedoms, and it induces you to install additional non-Free Software that it doesn't contain.

Linux-libre is a project to maintain and publish 100% Free distributions of Linux, suitable for use in Free System Distributions, removing software that is included without source code, with obfuscated or obscured source code, under non-Free Software licenses, that do not permit you to change the software so that it does what you wish, and that induces or requires you to install additional pieces of non-Free Software.

Recently Linux-Libre has been formally accepted as an official part of the GNU Project. The first release of Linux-libre since its dubbing as a GNU package is now available from the download links off of http://linux-libre.fsfla.org/"

Patents

Submission + - MIME Co-Creator Discusses 'Defensive' Patents (adtmag.com)

msmoriarty writes: MIME Co-Creator Nathaniel Borenstein, who sent out the first MIME message on March 11, 1992, never patented the technology, and continues to believe that "patents are deeply evil." However, he also endorses a recent patent that the company he now works for filed. Why? He explains in this interview: "Unfortunately...it's also true that deeply evil people can hurt you, and you really have a responsibility to protect yourself."
Security

Submission + - Secret Service takes out "astonishing" cyber theft ring (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "The U.S. Secret Service, teamed with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to arrest 19 people the agencies said operated a cyber crime ring that specialized in identity theft and counterfeit credit card trafficking. According to the Secret Service the group operated on multiple cyber platforms and members bought and sold stolen personal and financial information through online forums, particularly Carder.su."

Submission + - Scientology powerful enough to squash a FBI raid? More likely than you think (villagevoice.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After talking with more than half a dozen of the people who gave information to the FBI, we gleaned these details of the FBI's plans about raiding the base to free the executives held against their will in the "The Hole" as the summer of 2010 began:

-- The FBI had gathered high resolution images of the base using drone aircraft that were so detailed, informants were able to identify individuals in the images for the agency.

-- Expecting David Miscavige to flee the base once he, in all probability, got tipped to the raid, his various avenues of escape were evaluated, including the possibility that he'd make for Tom Cruise's private hangar in Burbank. The tail numbers on Cruise's aircraft were even gathered, one informant says.

-- At least three informants were asked if they'd be willing to go along on a raid of the base in a black, unmarked van, from which they could relay instructions to agents as they apprehended people.

-- Another informant was asked if he'd be willing to pretend to recant his defection from the church, and then go back to work at the base as an undercover plant.

-- One informant says raids were planned not only for the International Base, but also for each of the Church of Spiritual Technology locations, the vaults where Hubbard's works are being archived that we wrote about last month.

Then, something happened. We've heard a few different stories from informants about incidents on the local level which may have motivated FBI officials in Washington to kill the investigation, but Rathbun and Rinder both tell me they believe those local incidents were merely excuses for what both of them had expected would happen.

Some time before October 6, 2010, word came from Washington that the the probe was finished.

Here's how we know that. [more @ link]

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What are your top work-from-home tips? 2

ichard writes: "In a couple of months I'm going to start working from home full-time. I've been thinking about the obvious things like workspace ergonomics, but I'm sure there are more subtle considerations involved in a zero-minute commute. What are other Slashdot readers' experiences and recommendations for working from home?"
Linux

Submission + - Linux For The Real World (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The recent Linux Foundation report about the Linux jobs market highlighted a need for experienced professionals, but the traditional Linux training and certification programs don’t always impart the kind of skills actually required by employers. In an attempt to bridge this gap, veteran Linux trainer and Linux Journal associate editor Shawn Powers has teamed up with CBT Nuggets to develop a series of Linux training videos entitled “Linux for the Real World.” According to the description, this course “goes beyond the hypotheticals to walk viewers through real-world situations.”
Politics

Submission + - 8200+ Strong, Researchers Demand Journals To Open Access (singularityhub.com)

kkleiner writes: "Academic research is behind bars and an online boycott by 8,209 researchers (and counting) is seeking to set it freewell, more free than it has been. The boycott targets Elsevier, the publisher of popular journals like Cell and The Lancet, for its aggressive business practices, but opposition was electrified by Elsevier’s backing of a Congressional bill titled the Research Works Act (RWA). Though lesser known than the other high-profile, privacy-related bills SOPA and PIPA, the act was slated to reverse the Open Access Policy enacted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008 that granted the public free access to any article derived from NIH-funded research."
Android

Submission + - Free Apps Eat Your Smartphone Battery (techweekeurope.co.uk) 1

judgecorp writes: "Here's a reason to pay for smartphone apps. The free versions can spend three times as much energy finding and serving ads as they do on their actual job. Research from a Purdue university scientist found that as much as 75 percent of the energy used by free apps goes on accessing location services, finding suitable adverts and displaying them."

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