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Comment: Wait a min. - IBM wanted Government to dogfood OO? (Score 1) 331

by morganew (#29422509) Attached to: IBM Policy Switches From MS Office To OO.o

IBM has been spending millions of dollars lobbying for governments to mandate the use of Open Office, and yet they couldn't internally dogfood their own products? Sorry, but that's just too funny.

Maybe they thought those government types were going to turn in good bug reports so they wouldn't have to!

Comment: Re:Unlike IE, you can actually stop using Safari.. (Score 1) 578

by morganew (#28304255) Attached to: Microsoft Will Ship Windows 7 in Europe With IE Unbundled

As an Apple guy, I can tell you this is completely wrong. WebKit (the engine powering Safari) is a shared framework. it can be found here: /System/Library/Frameworks/WebKit.framework. This framework is key to the "help" Display system and Dictionary. In fact, the new safari 4 engine replaces the webkit framework.

You can check out more information at developers.apple.com

I don't want anyone to strip out the underlying code on either system - having someone else do all the work for building a Help system is a relief.

Comment: Re:I'm kinda in the vet biz (Score 1) 655

by morganew (#27470061) Attached to: How Do I Provide a Workstation To Last 15 Years?

My wife is a Veterinarian, and her practice has gone digital for all radiology. But the office and all radiology is PC only whereas our house is Mac (with some Linux server stuff - not important here).

I'd love to know what vendors are considering mac products for anything in the vet field. Ideally, my wife would love to be able to look at film on the mac, or even better on her iPhone.

Plums is now on the iPhone, as are a few other apps, looking at film would be the bees knees.

Comment: Re:Know what you want from a degree (Score 1) 918

by morganew (#27362267) Attached to: With a Computer Science Degree, an Old Man At 35?

There are some good points there, but I'll offer another possibility; maybe the "end" college provides is more significant than just the goal portion.

I hire people, and generally I treat a college degree as a prerequisite. Not because of specific coursework, but because the fact someone has completed a degree demonstrates an ability to keep on task for an extended period of time regardless of distractions. I don't mind major switchers, and I'm not looking for someone who did it in three years to the exclusion of life. Rather, I want to see that someone figured out how to navigate the always Byzantine requirements to get the right class into your schedule in the right order within a time limit.

Additionally, the social skills from college become pretty important - it's pretty hard to make it out of college without some kind of lab class that involves working with classmates on a group project. And everyone had someone in that project who didn't do what everyone wanted, or at least didn't pull their fair share. I want to know how you dealt with that, how did you feel about it, and what did you learn from it.

Finally, and MOST critically, I am always on the lookout for people who can write well on deadline. regardless of the technical nature of the project, the ability to explain what you are doing and why is just essential.

So yes, it's great if you can see your path in college as stepping stones to specific knowledge, but you shouldn't ignore the ancillary benefits that employers count on.

Comment: Re:Three strikes plan? (Score 1) 81

by morganew (#27268735) Attached to: TechDirt's Masnick Responds To Warner's Jim Griffin On Choruss

I did RTFA, this was strictly in response to the OP who was using the phrase "MUSIC FILES SHOULD BE FREE, PERFORMANCES SHOULD BE PAID FOR, THIS IS THE 21st CENTURY DEFINITION OF A MUSICIAN."

the question of Choruss and compensation plans is a separate point. And certainly one that needs more scrutiny.

Comment: Re:Three strikes plan? (Score 1) 81

by morganew (#27264075) Attached to: TechDirt's Masnick Responds To Warner's Jim Griffin On Choruss

I shall repeat:

Musicians DO choose the method of music distribution that best suits their needs! they CHOOSE to sign a contract with a studio rather than using the self publishing route. Musicians have the same inalienable rights as the rest of us, they are fully emancipated.

That some of them choose to go through a studio that has draconian DRM policies is their choice! If you feel strongly about it, then the choice of studio that the musician makes should help you decide if you want to listen to his/her music.

Nothing will work faster at changing polices like lack of money to studio artists.

Comment: Re:Three strikes plan? (Score 2, Insightful) 81

by morganew (#27264045) Attached to: TechDirt's Masnick Responds To Warner's Jim Griffin On Choruss

Since when did produced, professional music become such a life necessity that you get to dictate the cost structure and business model?

If you don't like how they distribute music, Don't BUY IT!

Why is that so damn hard to understand? The value of the music is the nexus of what the artist/studio is willing to sell it for, and what you are willing to pay for it. The "21st Century Definition of a Musician" clearly includes the ability of a musician to refuse to sign a contract with a big studio. Why do you somehow think the artist is being repressed? The artists have heard of the internet too, yet somehow, they keep doing deals with studios! I wonder if somehow, they think studios do things that they will have to spend a lot of time and money to do, like front money for big venues, pay for plane tickets, studio time, etc etc.

I am so sick and tired of the bastille storming attitude regarding music. I've decided to buy the (little) I want, and ignore the rest.

To shake your little fist in the air at the music "man" is just sad and pathetic.

Comment: Moody and Allison need to re-read history on GPLv3 (Score 1) 408

by morganew (#27098975) Attached to: The Real Reason For Microsoft's TomTom Lawsuit

I'm bothered that FSF has pulled down the discussion and dialog that led to the GPLv3, but if anyone can find it, you will see that under v2 you could structure a patent licensing deal in a way that did not cover downstream users of the code. The clear and obvious example was the Novell deal. v3 was altered to prevent patent deals like the Novell deal (and you'll note that Linux still seems to stick with v2).

So for Jeremy to argue that deals can't be done under v2 flies in the face of Eben Moglen's reading of the law. And while Jeremy's a better coder, Moglen's a better lawyer.

This is pure bunk. Ignore and move on.

Microsoft

+ - Micosoft Sues TomTom for Patent Infringement

Submitted by
morganew
morganew writes "Microsoft has filed suit against GPS handheld manufacturer TomTom for infringing on 8 separate patents; 5 related to nav, and 3 related to file systems. While Microsoft is the usual black hat on slashdot, it appears that this might be blackhat on blackhat violence. TomTom were found to be a gpl violator in '04, sued Garmin in '07 and Toyota in '08 for infringing TomTom patents, and have a very restrictive EULA. So who's wearing the white hat here?"

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